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What's wrong with cx psu?

P4rth
  • 49 months ago

I don't see why people seem to hate the corsair cx series psu. What's the deal behind, I'm missing the picture.

Comments

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

They are made with lower quality capacitors which generally shortens the life of the unit. For only a tiny bit more money you get a much better unit. The CX430 is a solid buy for a budget low end system, but if you are building anything over $500 or so, it makes alot of sense to spend the $10-$15 extra dollars for a proper PSU.

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

Alright thanks, I'll return my cx and get something from evga.

  • 49 months ago
  • 2 points

What are your system specs? Which CX do you have?

Make sure to get a GOOD EVGA. Not all are good. Only go for the G2,GS,GQ,B2,P2 units.

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

Listen to tiny voices

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

SHHHHH! tiny voices!*whisper whisper

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

Lower quality components

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

Its a mediocre unit with mediocre build quality and performance and its usually is always overpriced.

  • 49 months ago
  • 0 points

526Chirstian:

It's not a big risk like if you used a seriously low quality unit, but it IS a real reliability downgrade.

Take the primary capacitors, for example.

Let's see for the CX600M (should apply for CX500M too).

The CX600M uses a Panasonic cap, 85C, 400V. If we were to assume that operating voltage was something like 380V with a temperature rise of 10C because of ripple current with a 40C ambient temperature and a rated 2000 hour load lifespan as provided by manufacturer (the load lifespan for the Seasonic G 550W's cap)...

(85-(40+10)) / 10 = 3.5

2000 x (400/380) x 23.5

23,818 hours.

Let's assume same operating conditions and rated lifespan but use the primary cap in the Seasonic G 550W I linked to you.

(105-(40+10)) / 10 = 5.5

2000 x (420/380) x 25.5

100,037 hours.

See the difference there? Sure, the capacitor likely won't have to deal with such conditions 24/7 and there's some assumptions that have to be made in order to work out the equations without all the data, but the math doesn't lie: The primary capacitor used in the CX-M would degrade much faster under the same operating conditions than the cap in the Seasonic G.

The CX/CX-Ms (not sure about the new ones but this applies to the CX500M too) also use sleeve bearing fans. Meanwhile the Seasonic G uses double ball bearing, which will last longer than the CX's would especially in conditions you would get in a PC's power supply. If that fan dies and it does so out of warranty you can have the fun of spending money to replace it or the power supply because it won't be worth it.

Want another benefit of getting the Seasonic G?

It utilizes synchronous rectification and buck step down converters for the minor rails (+5v and +3.3v) instead of the old, cheap group regulation in the CX500M/CX600M, providing better voltage stability and crossloading performance - and it really shows in tests. The Seasonic G 550W would be able to provide very nearly full power through +12v alone, the rail that powers things like your CPU and GPU, unlike the CX which will be more limited. We hardly use the minor rails nowadays so the Seasonic G 550W will have a bit more power headroom for any upgrades or extra overclocking. The Seasonic G would also be better for overclocking too considering its better +12v regulation (remember what I said in the beginning of the paragraph?) and ripple on top of all that. So with better performance and more headroom you could OC your 970 more than just a little assuming it doesn't hold itself back.

[comment deleted]
  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

This is especially apparent if you're pairing a CPU that pumps a lot of heat (say, a 4790k 9590) and a GPU that pumps a lot of heat (reference 280x).

FTFY

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

...and a GPU that pumps a lot of heat (reference 280x ASUS Strix 390X).

FTFY

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