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Custom water cooling loop?

Unicorns_revenge

45 months ago

Anyone wanna inform me of the general way its done? Like all the parts and what they all do? Also any recommendation of parts or kits? (If it helps, my case is a Phanteks Enthoo EVOLV ATX)

Comments

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Tube - Transports the liquid

Pump - Pumps water around (Usually only need one unless you have multiple graphics cards, cpu and a lot of bends)

Reservoir- Holds water so that the pump can always be filled, if the pump runs dry it will break. Don't quote me on this but the pump must be under the reservoir.

CPU and GPU Blocks, these are the parts that connect to the cpu and gpu Generally try and find a full cover block because in addition to the gpu they provide cooling to the vrms and mosfets.

Radiators- they dissipate the heat, there are a lot of myths about these so I recommend you watch Jayztwocents on youtube. He is the king of watercooling.

Fans- Preferably high static pressure over airflow and push/pull vs push and pull make very little difference.

Fittings- Get compression fittings because nothing would suck worse than accidently popping out your tube and ruining your expensive parts. Also make sure to get the right type hard compression tubing for hard tube or regular compression fittings for rubber tube. Also make sure they are the correct size.

I would recommend that you watch a lot of tutorials. EKWB.com makes probably the highest end watercooling parts you can find. Be aware a high end system can set you back 6-7 hundred.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Awesome man! Thanks for the help! Really appreciate it!

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

You said I need a pump for multiple graphics cards...I can water cool those to? But how is that possible, do I need an adapter or something to connect it?

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, its rare that you need multiple. Linus's 7 gpu build needed 2 because 7 gpu blocks. It basically involves removing the cooler from the pcb and putting on a custom block. Its essentially the same as a cpu block but for the entire gpu. EK also sells a lot of custom waterblocks. If your buying parts now its usually easier to find waterblocks for reference coolers because other brands might use a different pcb.

Also make sure you have one 120mm fan for each heat generating component in your system. A cpu and a gpu would be atleast a 240mm rad. If you overclock you should add another. Or go with a larger/ wider rad.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Okay! Thanks! For reals, this'll really help a lot!

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Also maintenance wise, should the liquid be changed everynow and then or refilled, or something? What kinda maintenance should I expect?

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

You are right about the putting the pump under the reservoir. You put it under the reservoir so that when you are filling the system gravity puts the liquid into the pump from the reservoir. Other than that, nice comment man.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

For the convenience of me, I have only used EKWB parts here, but really you could use parts from other/cheaper companies. Enjoy.

CPU Waterblock With the CPU waterblock, make sure that it fits your socket, and that it does not interfere with other components on the motherboard. Unless you are doing some high end crazy stuff, I normally would recommend the cheaper stuff.

GPU Waterblock With the GPU waterblock, make sure that it is your exact model of GPU, not just something like 980ti, but like Gigabyte Windforce edition or something of the sort. All cards are not equal. They come in different shapes and sizes and an MSI block probably wont work with a Gigabyte block.

Reservoir With reservoirs, all you really need is a small one. Of course the bigger it is the cooler it will look, but in reality all you need is a reservoir with a few holes.

Pump With pumps, you really don't need the super expensive high end stuff unless you have something like 4 way SLI waterblock and cpu block. If you are just doing your CPU then any old pump should do just fine.

Fittings There are a few different kind of fittings. Compression fittings are a little more trustworthy IMO as they create a tighter seal on the tubing and they do not require something like a zip tie. Barbed fittings on the other hand, are cheaper yes, but they also do "require" some kind of zip tie or something on the outside of the tube. The reason I say require is that it would work without it, you would just have a larger chance of a leak. Make sure that you get the correct kind of fitting for the job. A barbed fitting would not work very well with hard line tubing. Rule of thumb for me is that get 3 fittings for every block, pump, etc.

Radiators and Fans For me, I have found with just a CPU loop a single 120mm or 140mm radiator works just fine. If you are doing some crazy overclock then I might recommend a dual 120mm radiator, but it's probably fine either way. If you have your GPU in the mix, I would definitely recommend a dual 120mm radiator, or even a 3x120mm radiator. Fan wise, you don't have to be too picky. I have had good results with Corsair AF120's, but I don't have too much experience otherwise in other fans.

Tubing Tubing is something that really doesn't matter until it does. Life is easy with soft tubing. Just plug and play kinda. But the second you do hard tubing you better be prepared for a couple hours or pain trying to get those curves just right. I have nothing against hard tubing, I just know from experience that it is a pain in the *** to try to bend without proper tools (hah)

Anyway, I probably forgot something vital to answering your question but whatever. Hope this at least helps!

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you very much!

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

By dual 120mm rad do you mean 240mm?

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

yup, same thing

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

An maintenance wise, should the liquid be changed everynow and then or refilled, or something? What kinda maintenance should I expect?

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

I would change my liquid every few months or so, what I would just be checking is the liquid quality via the radiator. If you notice you are getting unbearable temps then I would highly suggest that you change it. But really it is an eyeballing thing.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

So just change out the liquid? Is there anything else i need to do? Like with the radiator? Or pump? And how to i change out the liquid? Wouldnt it get on my parts?

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