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+12v multiple/single rails

tlk7887
  • 47 months ago

Hey guys I've tried to do research on how the multiple rail and single rail psu work and can't decide which I should go with. I'm leaning towards single rail psu cause to my understanding they are easier to set up and use?

As you've probably noticed I'm quite new at this and would really love any advice or help anyone can give or if they can maybe explain in abit simpler terms for me?

Thanks a lot for any help guys.

Comments

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

Single rail PSU's are usually better for the sole reason that all the power is available to any component. For example, if you had 2 12v rails rated at 250w each, and you had a 9590 on one, you risk running out of power even if you don't have anything else that consumes much power. Therefore, that 500w power supply is maxed out at 250w for some components, and has surplus power for others that don't need as much. The single rail allows all the components to grab as much power as they need (so long as it stays within the rated power), so theoretically that 9590 now shares the same pool with everything else and can share with a GPU. If the CPU and GPU were on the same rail, you would have all kinds of problems with power consumption. Most multi rail power supplies are designed in a way that puts power hungry components on separate rails, but most high end power supplies are single rail for more predictable power delivery.

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks guys that's helped quite abit. The psu I was planning to get was a multi rail but I think I'll change and get a single rail now. Plus I found a corsair platinum for 760w compared to the gold 650w antec I was planning to get. I heard corsair is a better reputable psu manufacturer so that's a bonus

  • 47 months ago
  • 2 points

You can't judge the quality of a power supply by it's name and if it is single or multiple rail. You have to look at quality reviews.

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/PSUReviewDatabase.html

  • 47 months ago
  • -1 points

Going with a reputable brand name is always a good choice for psu, I do read product and customer reviews but I read the reviews of brands I know are good.

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

You can't just go on brand name alone, either.* EVGA and Corsair make a lot of high-quality PSUs, but they've released less than stellar lines like the SuperNOVA NEX and CX, respectively.

Read the reviews.

*Well... you can kind of do this for SeaSonic.

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

Multi-rail PSUs are theoretically safer because if something goes terribly wrong, you only dump part of the max current into the short circuit, etc. If I needed a PSU over 1200+ W, I would heavily lean towards multi-rail. Single-rail PSUs are theoretically easier to set up your system on because you don't even need to read which PCIe power cables are on each rail. Plug and play all the way.

In practice, both are safe and easy to use.

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks a lot for the info. I don't need a power supply that big so I think I'll stay with a single rail for ease of use. Being a first time builder I think that'll be a good idea haha

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