add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube

Where would i place my fans on my Fractal R4.

YourLocalPCNoob

74 months ago

How does the airflow move in the FR4? I know i need an intake and exhaust but im not exactly sure where the intake/exhaust fans will be.

Comments

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Intakes should be front, bottom, & side (if you have the mounts for them).

Exhausts should be rear & top.

Also on most fans they will put arrows showing direction of airflow and direction of rotation to help you know which way to face the fan when installing. If there are no arrows you just have to test it (you have a 50/50 chance of guessing right the first time anyways). Also note that sometimes even if the fan is blowing the air away sometimes you can feel air movement on the opposite side making you think the fan is blowing the wrong direction when it actually isn't...

For example. You have a correctly oriented front intake fan. You hold your hand up to the front of the case on the outside. You feel air movement but it's slight. You put your hand inside the case in front of the fan. You feel air movement but it's a lot. It's kind of an illusion just not with sight.

Hope that all made sense and hope this helps you out.

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

thanks wolf! It did really help me and now i know where to place my fans! Now i have to decide if i use AF or SP Corsair fans. Which one would you think is better for best airflow?

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

also if i utilize all these spots for fans will i necessarily get better airflow? Right now i think more fans=better airflow

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Filling all available fan mounts isn't completely necessary (although I tend to). More fans will mean more airflow, yes, but it will also mean more noise. You may also want to consider a fan controller. I personally like this.

A post I made about fan choice a while back on someone else's topic:

Link to a fan for reference. Remember you can add them over time so the money spent won't be felt as much. And as a side note... When you do your build make sure to practice good 'Cable Management' to maximize your airflow and give less random surfaces to catch dust. If you need to, there are many guides out there to help that can be found with a simple web / youtube search.

Things to pay attention to when you are looking at fans:

  • Make sure you match the size (120mm, 140mm, etc.).
  • Look at the airflow, You will see a value followed by "CFM" (Air Flow 41.9 - 65.0 CFM). CFM = cubic feet per minute. Fans that list values like the example have variable speed options so the lower the speed the lower the CFM. Also, creating something called positive pressure will help to reduce dust inside the case. Positive pressure is basically having more CFM intake (air going into the case) than CFM exhaust (air going out of the case).
  • Look at the noise level (Noise Level 10.1 - 19.6 dbA). Again, variable speed will cause different values. Lower is quieter.
  • Bearing type: Fluid Dynamic Bearings(FDB)are arguably the best, however, here's a little info:

Sleeve bearings use two surfaces lubricated with oil or grease as a friction contact. They often use porous sintered sleeves to be self-lubricating, requiring only infrequent maintenance or replacement. Sleeve bearings are less durable at higher temperatures as the contact surfaces wear and the lubricant dries up, eventually leading to failure; however, lifetime is similar at relatively low ambient temperatures. Sleeve bearings may be more likely to fail at higher temperatures, and may perform poorly when mounted in any orientation other than horizontal. The lifespan of a sleeve-bearing fan may be around 40,000 hours at 50 °C. Fans that use sleeve bearings are generally cheaper than fans that use ball bearings, and are quieter at lower speeds early in their life, but can become noisy as they age.

Rifle bearings are similar to sleeve bearings, but are quieter and have almost as much lifespan as ball bearings. The bearing has a spiral groove in it that pumps fluid from a reservoir. This allows them to be safely mounted with the shaft vertical (unlike sleeve bearings), since the fluid being pumped lubricates the top of the shaft. The pumping also ensures sufficient lubricant on the shaft, reducing noise, and increasing lifespan.

Ball bearings Though generally more expensive, ball bearing fans do not suffer the same orientation limitations as sleeve bearing fans, are more durable at higher temperatures, and are quieter than sleeve-bearing fans at higher rotation speeds. The lifespan of a ball bearing fan may be over 60,000 hours at 50 °C.

Fluid bearings have the advantages of near-silent operation and high life expectancy (comparable to ball bearings), but tend to be the most expensive.

Magnetic bearings or maglev bearings, in which the fan is repelled from the bearing by magnetism.

  • Shock-Absorbing Rubber Pads. Such as pictured here. Rubber pads with embedded steel threads absorb vibrations and noise as well as ensuring a secure fit.
  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Wow thats a lot of info! Ill be honest and say i didnt understand the info on the different types of bearings on the fan. However i appreciate that link to the NZXT controller. Does each number indicate the fan(s) in the build? And the knob allows you to change the speed of the fan right? * Are these rifle bearing fans? http://www.coolermaster-usa.com/upload/product/2977/gallery/full/1.jpg

  • Thanks for your help. I think ill be going with Corsair AFs for intake and exhaust and they have shock absorbing rubber paths. Could you recommend any better fans?
  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

You can use a splitter and run more than one fan off of each control. The knob controls the speed of the fan which in turn controls the CFM and dbA.

Noctua I hear are good. You should be just fine with the Corsair AFs.

I've personally been using this. I set it up like this. On the fan controller I use #1 for front and bottom intake, #2 for side intake, #3 for 2 internal 120 mm's, #4 for RAM cooler, #5 for H100i push/pull, #6 for top exhaust / rear exhaust. The fan controller LEDs cycle through some different colors or you can turn off the LEDs completely. I'm still in progress with this build but I haven't taken a pic yet. Maybe I'll have to sometime soon.

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah you should put it on PCPP! Do you ever see yourself lowering down the speed of a certain fan ocassionally? Can you see the dba/CFM directly on the fan controller or do you have to find it out via software on the PC?

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Normally the intake side of the fan is open and the exhaust of the fan has the plastic connectors going to the center

Sort

add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube