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JHudson3
  • 43 months ago

When people see Windows or Mac they think- Lets get it!

If I tried to make a sale point with:

4-Core CPU YES 8GB RAM YES Wireless Adapter EVEN BETTER Micro-ATX form factor FITS WELL Room for expansion LAST US A WHILE Linux OS (Mint 17th edition) OMG THIS THING IS A POS. NOT BUYING. DEAD TO ME

Linux has been improving its GUI ten-fold. Distributions like Ubuntu and Mint even offer app stores and communities to help people with installations, troubleshooting, and new OS downloads. Its like on over-sized smartphone OS. For FREE. Comes with basic productivity software: Such as Open Office, and all sorts of text editors. I have never run into driver issues with my linux distro so far.

Not to mention that my Linux Mint distro comes with Windows compatibility applications that allow you to use Microsoft applications on a FREE operating system. Win Win in my eyes.

I just need opinions. Poll tie.

Comments

  • 43 months ago
  • 4 points

I've been using Linux as a main OS for over seven years, starting off with Ubuntu, and having used Mint, Fedora, and Debian at length. Currently using MX Linux. Anyway, I'd like to think that I've gotten accustomed to some of the ups and downs of Linux, so here goes my long ramble. Note that I'm not a typical user and my use case does not reflect that of most people, and I may have some biases going on here.

Linux is visibly faster and more stable than Windows from my experience, and the user friendliness has improved considerably. I wouldn't say that the GUI situation has improved tenfold; that's a stretch. But it's comparable to Windows in my view, and actually better in some regards. KDE in particular is worth mentioning for its lovely glassy look, which I think compares very favorably to Windows 7. Furthermore, having seen the darkest depths of the Windows Control Panel, which haven't really improved even in Windows 10, I'd actually make the argument that the Linux equivalents are nicer.

Some people speak about problems in troubleshooting Linux. This is definitely an issue, but I don't think it's quite as big a deal as people make it out to be, mainly because I find that Windows troubleshooting can be equally unsatisfactory at times. Granted, Linux troubleshooting is not a small deal, because when a problem does arise, you often have to scavenge Stack Overflow among several other forums to find the exact problem you have. That being said, the Windows users I've met have similar sounding woes with drivers failing, performance problems, etc. that they end up having to look up on the Internet, and I find that Microsoft's online help is sometimes incredibly unhelpful. For Linux troubleshooting, I've personally found that I get a great deal of useful stuff out of the Arch Linux forums and wiki, probably because in order to use Arch Linux at all, you really have to know your ****. That being said, the Arch Linux forums and wiki are also pretty technically inclined, making them kinda unhelpful for newbies.

The software situation on Linux is the single biggest issue that most people cite, and I agree that it's the single biggest issue. In particular, gaming is Linux's Achilles heel. A lot of people have that one game - or several games - that are Windows only, so if they look to Linux, they have to contend with the massive crapshoot that is Wine. Wine has gotten better, but it's not there yet. I'd wager that for every program that works well under Wine, there are probably about three to five that run like garbage, or don't run at all. A few people also complain about driver issues and whine about how Linux does worse on gaming benchmarks compared to Windows. But this argument isn't nearly as realistic in my opinion. In practice, a few frames isn't going to kill anything unless you're really hardcore. I'm hoping that the newfangled AMDGPU driver turns out really well so that people would just shut up about this. The advent of Wayland should also help a bit with this, since it's lower latency than X11.

For my part, I've managed to work with Linux for seven years and had a great experience partly because I'm not really a heavy gamer, partly because I've gotten fairly good at using the Internet to troubleshoot problems, and partly because I've gotten really comfortable about problems emerging. When I do game, I usually make it a point to play and buy games that have Linux native ports. A lot of great games have Linux ports nowadays thanks to Steam, which is wonderful, but there are also still many others that do not. Also, as an example of how my use case is really not normal, the video driver on my desktop recently blew up because I decided that I wanted to forcibly upgrade it to a newer kernel version, so now it only boots into a command line. A lot of people would freak out and think a catastrophe occurred, but I'm like, "Oh. Well, the OS still works. I'll see if I can get the driver working on the new kernel, but if not, I'll just roll it back to the old kernel. Or maybe try nouveau or something. One way or another, I'll have my GUI back." I can't fix it right now because I'm on college campus, but it shouldn't take too long once I get the chance.

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the very detailed response

  • 43 months ago
  • 2 points

Linux has been improving its GUI ten-fold

Show me, i'd like to see this.

My biggest arguments for using windows are

  1. Fimiliarity

  2. Easier to troubleshoot problems. When people publish help guides, they do it for windows first, and the mac and maybe linux

  3. Games

Also, linux sounds dumb. Just the name, but thats an opinion. I wouod be mich more inclined to use linux if there was a distro named polar ice or something

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm not sure I understand your argument. Sorry.

[comment deleted]
  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the very detailed response! Kind of nice to have a list and two different suggestions for running windows applications.

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted]
  • 43 months ago
  • 2 points

Definitely would not recommend to majority of the beginners/novice for desktop use.
For power users, CLI knowledge is basically a requirement.

Readily available written documentation is not as thorough as Windows, heavy reliance of the internet for obtaining answers and if user(s) has internet connectivity issues, they are S.O.L.
Many distros idea of long term support is a joke. Three - five years for ubuntu and variants.
Exceptions being RHEL, SuSE and their variants. e.g. CentOS, Scientific...

For those requiring basic tasks such as just browsing the internet and watching Youtube, should be acceptable.

The very thing that makes Linux so flexible is what causes nightmares for developers and tech support.

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Haven't thought of it that way. Thanks.

[comment deleted]
  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

I had forgotten about that hiccup. I always select custom install options and configuring auto-connect is one of the first things I do. :)

[comment deleted]
  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Hiccup as in home/desktop use.
Home users rarely care (and understandably so) about SELinux implementation, including automatic network connection access.
There is usually higher threat from curious children running around or the family pet(s) exploring the keyboard.

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted]
  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Not really. Windows 7 was released in July 2009 and supported to January 2020.
And that is only if Microsoft does not extend it further like they did with Windows XP, which was from August 2001 - April 2014.

[comment deleted]
  • 43 months ago
  • 2 points

Yes and if one has the money, custom support agreements are still available for Windows XP.

  • 43 months ago
  • 2 points

One word: DirectX

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Currently I would say I'm using 80% linux at home and 70% linux at work. (Work was previously about 90% windows, but 2 months ago I started working with new software so it jumped to mostly linux). Currently using Ubuntu (not that I particularly like it, but nearly all of my work is CLI anyway... so I don't deal with the desktop environment much).

I think there are pretty wide examples of the advantages/disadvantages of linux in this thread so I won't really rehash it. It mostly just comes down to software. Unless you work in a scientific or technical field, windows will always have better (or the only) software support.

In my experience (very little experience with OS X), stable linux releases have very minimal issues - if something is expected to work, it works - Windows rarely goes more than a week or two in my hands without making me very pissed off about some stupid driver issue, etc.

In my (quite possibly naive) eyes, you aren't a power user unless you have at least an intermediate knowledge of linux. I can understand software limitations and I consider these exceptions.

In direct response to the OP, I wouldn't exactly say Linux has improved its GUI ten fold, but it's certainly on par (or can be) with Windows 10 and OS X. There have been considerable advances lately in ease of installation and QoL improvements for sure. I 100% agree that linux is a Win/Win.

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Will be doing a FAA Certified X99 X-Plane 11 Build using Linux Ubuntu 16.04. XP11 uses Linux very well and been using 16.04 on my laptop to test it out and love it. Simple and bloat free for most part.

Overall pleased with it. Also use a mac mini which is basically a part of Linux.

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

I love Linux! I used to distro hop quite a but. I had Arch installed as my main OS for a while, but ended up going back to Windows. I love sim racing and since Linux is not supported for any of them I had to switch back. I know IRacing has a Linux port but that is the only one. If only automobilista,RF2 and raceroom used unreal engine instead of dx they would be supported...I can say I miss Linux. I enjoy doing everything from a command line

[comment deleted]
  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for your reply. I agree with your views. If more people took the leap towards open-source software it would seem much less daunting to use in a home/business environment.

[comment deleted]
  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. I am a Linux user myself (I have been using Linux Mint 17.1) trying to learn the in and outs of the operating system. I have yet to run into any major obstacles. Once I do, perhaps, my views on its use as a end-user solution for everyone will change.

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

I want to go linux Ubuntu 16.04 using x99 and 6800k with a 1070/80 card but I'm scared of motherboard compatible and having problems I use Ubuntu on laptop and love it

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted by staff]
  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

I wont put Windows 10 on my pc because its crap and a utter mess for my bussiness

[comment deleted by staff]

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