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Can I do much with this pre-built?

Schlost

36 months ago

I know that most of you may immediately think that it would be wiser and cheaper for me to build a computer for myself, and I do not doubt that, but I found this deal and I feel a lot more comfortable with a warranty on the entire machine rather than individual parts. This is the PC I'm looking at:

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883221275

It seems like it's fairly capable, though the GPU may be lacking I'm alright with that for now as it seems it would play most things on at least medium settings, which I'm completely fine with.

What I need though is opinions and information. Does this PC look as if it could be upgraded in the future? Say if I got a better GPU or found a newer PSU, would I be able to swap these pieces out easily? I'd probably end up trying to get into a 1060 one day, to up my gaming and I've got an old CXM 450 bronze from my old PC that I think could be put to use.

Let me know what you guys think, it'd be really appreciated!

Comments

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

It looks fine, although I think it looks overpriced to me (Maybe its because Im from the US and CAD is usually higher in prices anyway)

I mean I guess if you're fine with a prebuilt it should work, and it should be upgradable, but you could save more and better balance your build if you build it yourself. All the parts come with a manufacturers warranty btw.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

Most of the builds I've found have usually been like that (lower US higher CAD), but I had just found this one discounted heavily being refurbished. It's just the task of putting it together and lack of knowledge basically that keeps me back from just buying the pieces. Are the manufacture warranties decent though?

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

If you look at my builds, my first even PC had an i3-6100 and a GTX 960 in it. I had no idea what I was doing and I really didn't have much knowledge on PC building. My parts were not the greatest choices but I did my research before picking out the parts and when I was building I watched videos and read the instructions. In all it took me about 2 hours and it was like putting together electronic legos. :)

Yes, the manufacturer warranties protect again dead or broken parts.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

This is what I originally had cooked up for my own build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-6500 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor $263.74 @ Vuugo
Motherboard MSI B150M BAZOOKA Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $79.99 @ NCIX
Memory Kingston HyperX Fury Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2133 Memory $67.98 @ DirectCanada
Storage Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $61.98 @ DirectCanada
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1060 3GB 3GB Windforce OC Video Card $278.98 @ DirectCanada
Case Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mini Tower Case $39.99 @ NCIX
Power Supply Corsair CXM 450W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $38.98 @ NCIX
Optical Drive Asus DRW-24F1ST DVD/CD Writer $19.95 @ Vuugo
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $117.75 @ shopRBC
Wireless Network Adapter TP-Link TL-WDN4800 PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi Adapter $45.99 @ DirectCanada
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1060.33
Mail-in rebates -$45.00
Total $1015.33
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-11-21 12:08 EST-0

I think the pieces are good enough to stand a couple of years, I'm just really worried about the actual piecing together and the logistics after. It's a lot of money to invest, y'know? Ahaha, perhaps I could also get someone more experienced to put it together.

How do the warranties work then? Say my RAM fails and it fries my mobo, would I have to send both parts out separately and then have to put the PC back together myself after? I may sound lazy, which I'm not doubting, but it also sounds like a lot of room for error on my part.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

Well the only way your RAM would fail and short out your motherboard, would be if you forced it into the slot and it didnt fit in the first place, and you tried to boot it.

Lets say your PSU doesn't work when you get it, you would fill out an RMA form and send it back to Corsair and they will either fix it, or send you a replacement PSU.

GPU doesn't work? RMA it to Gigabyte and they will again, either replace it or fix it for you.

Yes you do have to take stuff out if things don't work, and yes it can be annoying, but it isnt that hard and you get better use of your money by building your own PC.

Id suggest someone who knows how to build a PC to help you, or you can either purchase a custom built system that you pick the parts for, or pay someone who knows how to build, to build it for you.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

I appreciate the help friend! Do you know of any companies that do such things where you can pick the parts for that's semi-reasonable? I feel as if the premiums are always quite high.

I think you may be right on this being the best bang for my buck, but I only have one more question; Would it be wiser to hold off another week to purchase the parts, or should I just get them asap? I'm running off of an old laptop, which does my browsing and youtube just fine but it'd probably have a hard time running any sort of game, ahaha.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

The case is bad, the PSU is bad, it costs WAY too much for the performance since it would be par graphically with a ~$400 build depending on what CPU you use, and its used so you would getting a used build with most likely a 1 year warranty.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i3-6100 3.7GHz Dual-Core Processor $139.99 @ DirectCanada
Motherboard Asus H110M-A/M.2 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $74.99 @ Newegg Canada
Memory *G.Skill Aegis 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2133 Memory $44.99 @ Newegg Canada
Storage Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $61.98 @ DirectCanada
Video Card MSI Radeon RX 470 4GB ARMOR OC Video Card $229.99 @ Newegg Canada
Case Deepcool TESSERACT BF ATX Mid Tower Case $39.99 @ Newegg Canada
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $591.93
*Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-11-21 11:56 EST-0500

It has a Insanely better GPU, a non total **** case, longer warranty on the parts, and its cheaper.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

My issue is though is that I'm really not that good at dealing with the components themselves. I was thinking that the whole thing could probably play most of the recent games out, no? I'm not looking to OC or test out VR on the machine really, I only need something that could play the likes of Rust and Ark and deal with some school work.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

My issue is though is that I'm really not that good at dealing with the components themselves.

Mind explaining more?

It could but you would be paying a lot more for a build used parts with significantly worse performance and part selection and a much shorter warranty.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't like how fragile the pieces are, or at least how I perceive them to be, and it makes me overly cautious when dealing with it. I ended up messing up my last PC by trying to install a new PSU, and it was a big step back for me I think.

It's mostly the certainty that it would work is what I'd be paying for, and that others have bought and used the same rig. Just reliability though, to be honest.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

They are a lot more durable than they appear. I have bent a GPU before via dropped the build it was in and it still works, I have dropped a CPU and it still works, I dropped a case with a PSU in it and it still works, same for the HDD. I have tried to install RAM the wrong way and it still works. I have put at least 100 pounds of pressure on to a motherboard and it still worked . I have tried to pry a backplate lose and the motherboard was fine. As long as you use the right amount of force, don't go hulk basically, you will be fine.

Reliability is actually a BIG weakness of that pre built due to the short warranty that is likely 1 year where as most PC parts have at least a 3 year warranty or longer, it being used, and the part selection not being great to say the least, mainly the PSU.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

the PSU is bad

This is a bad trend that really needs to stop. Big companies like these would not put terrible ****** PSUs in their prebuilts and sell them to customers.

Sure they're not the best, but they're better then what most people think. For Lenovo, it gets the job done without exploding, and if it does fail, they will replace it within warranty.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

Its not a Logsyis or anything but it definitely isn't good and likely isn't even mediocre. Its likely the bare minimum which is what I would call bad.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

I know its not good, but when you associate something with bad most people are going to think = explodes, bursts into flames, shorts out, Logsyis, Dioblotek, Hercules, etc

Id say its mediocre at best, but that's just the way it is with prebuilts and at least the unit works better then those terrible brands and is covered under the whole systems warranty.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

I personally think that it would be kind of a hassle to switch the psu, but if your up to the task then go for it. Also be careful that you wont be able to oc the cpu since its not the 6700k. And if you were to want to switch the gpu make sure to purchase a blower style card of the 1060, such as the gtx 1060 founders edition.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the heads up on the 1060, I've always been confused by the different types to be honest. I'm not worried about OC'ing, I don't need the most powerful computer in the world, only something I could upgrade if need be.

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