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Attaching a regular fan to a CPU cooler block?

sebbie88

74 months ago

Is it possible to do that? I currently have a Zalman CPU cooler, but find it a little loud, but instead of buying an expensive Noctua one, I was wondering whether I could just buy a Noctua fan and attach it to the Zalman Cooler block? Is that a really dumb/impossible idea? If so, can you tell me what a cheap (<$50 I guess), quiet CPU cooler would be? Thanks for your replies!

Comments

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes you may do that... preferably a static pressure oriented fan such as the NF-PXX ones. or if you hate Noctua colors, you may use Corsair SPXXX series they are very sweet looking and are silent.

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for your reply. Since I really don't care about the color I will probably go with the Noctua ones. Besides static pressure oriented fans, what other types are there? Can you briefly explain the difference (or send me a link)?

  • 74 months ago
  • 2 points

The main difference between fans are CFM (Cubic feet per minute) and Static Pressure (generally measured in mmH2O or mmHg).

CFM is how much air the fans can move while Static Pressure is how well the fan pushses the air through or against object.

For radiators or cpu coolers you generally want high Static Pressure and case fans high CFM.

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Bitfenix Spectre Pro PWMs are beasts.

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah sure, sorry for late response but there is two types of fans(as of what I know). There is case fans(Air flow oriented) and HeatSink fans(Static pressure oriented). Static pressure fans' blades are mostly very close together and when you look at them, you see less of a gap between each blades. Air flow based fans' blades are usually at high angle and are meant for speed so there is more gap in between and offer a higher CFM(Cubic Feet per Minute) value. Same for Static pressure, the value measured for those is mmH2O(millimeters of water it can tether) alternatively mmHg(millimeters of mercury). I couldn't find a good enough link that I would like to share that would explain more what I say but at your level, what I just mentioned is enough for you to make a good choice for fan. If you are hesitant, give me a list of fans and I'll help choose what best suits your needs. When buying a fan, also consider the bearing type. Some bearings are meant for fans to be facing horizontal or vertical.

A good link for bearing VS sleeve (most common bearings)

For example, sleeve is best when the fan is facing the sides of the case and bad when facing the bottom or top.

Remember to consider, CFM/mmHG/mmH2O, noise emitted in dbA and bearing type. And unfortunate as it is, dbA does not tell the whole story. It just means how loud a fan is. There is no such thing as "silent fans" since the fan movement creates turbulence that creates noise. Though some noises are more pleasing to hear. For example, Noctua fans have a low dbA rating but compared to a fan with a lower dbA rating, it still seems more quiet. This is because Noctua fans' blades are designed with notches that cancels the sound in a way. Anyway, read reviews and ask us for recommendations and to critique your fan choice so we can orient you to a perfect fan for you and you should be good. Anyway, good luck.

I am in my holiday period so I might not respond quickly again. :/

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

I also would like to do this and was wondering if you did it and how do it work?

I have a brand new system and the installed water cooling system is vastly louder than my older computer with a cpu fan similar to the Noctua fan. My system builder offered to install a Noctua fan (to bring my noise down) for me BUT by fast DDR3 -1866MHz RAM has tall fins on them that are blocking the space required to install the Noctua fan. I guess the RAM is too close to the CPU and there is not enough space for the CPU fan. So I was thinking - maybe adding a cooler block to the CPU before adding the Noctua fan would raise the fan above the RAM and things might fit. What do you think?

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry I decided not to do it, because I realized that not my CPU fan was loud but rather my case fans. I replaced those with Noctua 120mm ones and that did the trick. They definitely looked like I could have just snapped them onto the cooling block, but I never actually tried.

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

OK thanks for the info. I actually did that as well. I had my system builder change my entire case as well to the one my old system used (Coolermaster Haf X) as it uses larger fans than the case they originally sold me on. This helped but it isn't really the greatest source of my noise problem. I also had a large CPU water cooling system that vented at the top of the case had them switch it to smaller one that vents out the back. It is quieter but still an issue for me. Just for fun I unplugged the fan to the CPU cooler and listened to my system - hugely different! That is much closer to what I would want in my small office.

So now the question is: A) is there a cpu cooler block tall enough to help, and which one is it? B) should I down grade my RAM to something slower and lower profile so that a Noctua type fan will fit!

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