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Is there a way to find out what Windows OS/Keys were on my motherboard?

FlyinToasteronie
  • 37 months ago

I bought a used motherboard, and I know that it was in a good PC (The guy told me there was an i5. I have no other info, but any desktop I5 is an alright CPU. It's LGA1150.) I want to know how do I find out what were the keys previously used on the mobo?

(Your Windows key is connected to your motherboard, and anytime you switch hardware other than the MoBo, windows will still work. ) Is there a place in the BIOS where I can find what OS or at least what key was used on it?

Comments

  • 37 months ago
  • 1 point

Product keys stored in drive which holds OS.

  • 37 months ago
  • 1 point

Again, I bought a used motherboard. The keys are somehow remembered on the MoBo. I don't have the HDD.

  • 37 months ago
  • 1 point

I think it is saved on Microsoft servers and not the motherboard itself. So the Windows product key is tied to the motherboard on the Microsoft servers. I did find a website that stated the following:

In the future, whenever you install Windows 10 on that same PC, it will automatically report to Microsoft’s activation servers. Microsoft will confirm that the PC with that specific hardware configuration is allowed to use Windows 10, and it’ll automatically be activated.

  • 37 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh alright, thank you for explaining.

  • 37 months ago
  • 1 point

Unless something has changed the product key would be stored within the registry on the boot hard drive. It's not stored on the motherboard/BIOS in the way that you mean. On OEM/builder copies of windows the motherboard and other hardware information is collected and stored as a single product with a unique product key for every major microsoft product within the system. Essentially that meant that if the product changed (new mobo) then the old product was /end of life and mostly you get to buy a new product key. As another poster linked...this practice seems to be going away.

Suppose you have the original hard drive that are mated with that motherboard...I have used a program that would find the key in the registry on my windows 10 machine that had previously free upgraded from windows 7. I do not recall the name but a quick google search for product key finder or something would probably yield those results. I did not have the original key because a network guy installed it and I was told it was a "volume license" which I've come to believe was not exactly the case. I had intended on using that key on a new box, but ended up shelling out the money for a fresh copy and keeping the other windows 10 machine alive and going in case I needed to pull something off since it was for my office computer for several years. I believe there are even hacks to unregister the key for the old computer and register for a new computer but that's just getting a little deep.

  • 37 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't have the original HDD, so RIP. Oh well, thanks for the detailed explanation. Now I understand how this works.

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