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Lights dimming during huge WIND - how can i be sure that pc is fine.

sew333
  • 30 months ago

Hello. I have an a little question. There was a huge WIND in my country yesterday. Power was on . But there was random , for split second lights dimming in my house. Computer was still on, and laptop ( laptop without battery ) was still on. So why both computers was on and wont turns off when lights was dimming? Thanks. And is this harmful to pc? How can i check that nothing damage in my pc? Ah i dont have UPS.

Psu is Corsair 750RM and MB: Asus Z170-P

So it can harm pc if during huge WIND my lights in house flickered for split second? But like i said pc not shutdown during this day with huge WIND. Only lights in house flickered few times for split second,thats all.

Comments

  • 30 months ago
  • 3 points

Most modern PSU's are rated something like 90-250V input. The AC power can vary anywhere in that range and the PSU will work fine. A "brown out" that often occurs during storms, is often just a voltage sag that dips below the standard line voltage for a short time, so the power feed from the transformer to your house sags with it, but the PSU keeps working normally and draws more current to make up for the lack of voltage.

Furthermore, the front end of a power supply will have a rectification stage and large filtering capacitor. The large filtering capacitor acts as an energy storage buffer. When a computer is operating at low load relative to the capacity of the PSU, this front end filtering can store enough energy to power the computer for a fraction of a second.

When we combine the fact that the PSU can tolerate wide voltage input, with the fact that we have a "buffered" power input as part of the natural consequence of an AC to DC power supply design, we get a device that is highly tolerant to "brown-outs."

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Does discharging that filtering capacitor repeatedly have a significant impact on expected life span of the PSU? Or to put it another way, would a significant number of brown outs tend to shorten PSU life times?

  • 30 months ago
  • 3 points

Unless you're operating the PSU at or near maximum rated power output all the time, and dealing with numerous brown-outs per week, I wouldn't even worry about the effect on PSU longevity.

Discharging the filtering capacitor is not the issue, the "wear" issue that may be of some concern would be increased input current required to make up for the loss in input voltage. This would only concern me if the PSU we're operating at a very high load. Most of the time, on consumer PC's, the PSU is operating at a fraction of rated power, so there's no concern.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok, good to know, Thanks. Would brownouts impact the lifespan of UPS battery's? When I lived in a place that had frequent brownouts, it seemed that the batteries in my UPS would fail more often then they do now.

Oh, may be helpful to say I am one of them that are pushing fairly high load, distributed computing projects keep my systems between 70 and 80% of max rated power most of the time.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

If your PSU's are operating at 70-80% of label capacity all the time, they are going to have a shorter life anyway, and frequent brown-outs won't help.

UPS batteries have to be very large to handle desktop computers with CPU's and GPU's running full tilt. UPS systems being operated near max label capacity during outages will rapidly "reveal" the natural battery aging that takes place in them regardless. Aging batteries will suffer from more voltage sag under a load. If you're using a UPS system rated barely large enough for your load, then it won't take long for the battery in the UPS to come up short of the demands.

My advise, if you're planning on operating systems at peak load all the time, is to purchase PSU's with approximately double the label capacity as the systems typical "maximum/continuous" load, and purchase UPS's rated to deliver quadruple the anticipated load. This will give you better tolerance to brown-outs, black-outs, and useful UPS battery longevity.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

The powersupply should have protection against things like this. Although, just to be safe, i would shut off and unplug the pc during the storm.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

So make test stability after this or this is not necessary?

  • 30 months ago
  • 5 points

If your PC is dead its dead and if it works it works, no testing or anything required.

  • 30 months ago
  • 2 points

Best answer. +1

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

As others have said, most PSUs have "electric flicker" protection. If it works it's fine. Not only that but you have a good power supply.

(Also my 200th comment)

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't quite understand the "Electric Flicker Protection". Is it slightly like a mini UPS in your PSU?

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Your power supply is of high quality. By "Electric Flicker Protection" I mean that your PSU will prevent ripples in the wall electrical current from harming your PC at all. This works both when there is too much or too little power coming from the wall.

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