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Query re good psus

CromCruach
  • 30 months ago

Hi,

I want a PSU that creates as little waste-heat as possible. I gather that the "titanium" -certified PSUs are the most efficient in that regard, correct? Recently, I upgraded my pc with a better psu and a better graphics card(asus strix 1060 6gb nvidia card). I was told that a higher-wattage psu was defnitely not either good or needed for my PC. I was not so sure about that, as my asus pc had a ****** (300w) no-brand(?) psu, and my pc often shut down frequently during the previous summer when I linked multiple gadgets(cameras etc.) to my pc in order to charge them up. I now have a 500w psu(be quiet/gold-certified), which I hope is good enough, if I want to do charge my electrical gadgets again. What is wrong about me getting, say, a 850W psu, titanium-certified?

Comments

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Nothing wrong with it per se, but it is a lot of money for little benefit for most people.

The least expensive options, which would be more than sufficient, are the Seasonic 650w Prime Titanium and the EVGA T2 750w. These are still almost double the price of a decent Gold unit on sale. Plus, you have a reasonable PSU (assuming it is the Straight Power 500w?) and only a moderate load.

Might there be a reason to get a titanium unit? If heat- and by extension, noise- is a pivotal concern (such as running the PC 24/7 working on things, small case, poor airflow, hot environment) it could be a possibility if other more efficient options have been explored, such as adding fans or changing cases. Maybe you do crypto mining and run your PC under heavy load for long periods. If these don't apply to you though, you would just be wasting money.

On a side note, USB connections are limited in power. Computer USB 2.0 ports are often limited to 0.5 amps, while a good wall port can deliver 2.1 amps, and Quick Charge compatible devices can mess with voltage as well from a compatible charger. It may be worth getting a dedicated multi-port charger for your devices rather than relying on the computer ports.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, I have already bought a power bank and various adapters etc. so that I can just plug all my electrical gadgets into the wall-socket. I did indeed notice that my PC took ages to load some electrical gadgets. In one case, the relevant gadget, which was turned on, managed to lose all its electricity, despite it being connected via usb to my PC.

One question:- these new usb-type-C cables? Would they be able to charge electrical gadgets properly? Thanks.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Theoretically, yes. In practice I haven't used any C to C connections, nor have I done research on the limits of a motherboard-connected C port.

[comment deleted]

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