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Changed memory speed/timing... can't get PC to load anymore... gah

epiktek

23 months ago

So I finally booted up my newly built PC, and it loaded up BIOS. The only thing I changed were the memory settings. I changed the RAM to 3200MHz and then set it to DOCP Standard. I have 32GB of Flare X 3200MHz 14-14-14-34 1.35V ram. All specs seemed in line.

I hit F10, and it asked if I wanted to "Save and Rest." I clicked "YES," and then the monitor went blank... I thought the computer would restart, but no... it's just on. The power light is on, but the monitor doesn't detect anything. It says "No Display Port Signal."

I tried hitting the power button on the CPU, and whereas in the past, it would just turn off, I noticed this time I had to hold it down for a few seconds for it to turn off. And when I turned the computer on, the monitor did not register anything. It just says "No Display Port signal," and the computer power light is on... what did I do wrong?

I wasn't even overclocking. The 3200MHz speed and DOCP Standard (14-14-14-34 1.35V) was specifically set to the advertised speed of the Flare X Ram...

Comments

  • 23 months ago
  • 2 points

If you are changing the ram to it's rated speeds and timings you should simply be enabling an XMP profile as it is set by the manufacturer with the appropriate settings the dimms are rated for.

The best way for you to fix this would be to clear the CMOS on your motherboard. You would need to consult your motherboards manual on how to do this (it can be found online if you don't have it). Clearing your CMOS should have reset all settings in the bios to their factory state (the ram should bounce back down to the ddr4 startard settings (2133 MHz) you should then be able to boot the PC again, at which point you can change the settings as you wish. However, if you are trying to set the ram to the settings for which it is rated, enabling an XMP profile is the best way of doing this.

Hope that helps, good luck :)

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the prompt and easy-to-understand reply. I have checked my motherboard's manual to clear CMOS, and it requires two screwdrivers to hit the CLRTC pins. Prior to shopping for mobos, I kept hearing people mentioning one of the CONS of certain mobos being the lack of a RESET button. Now I understand them finally.

My board is Strix X370-F from Asus. It does not offer XMP for BIOS. Only Auto, Manual, DOCP Standard, DOCP 1, 2, 3, 4, etc. All DOCP settings change the timing to the rated speed of the RAM (3200MHz 14-14-14-34). I just used Standard, though... I don't know what the difference is between all the different DOCP options.

Apparently I read Asus didn't want to pay royalties for XMP profile, so DOCP is supposed to be the Asus version of XMP.

Any suggestions?

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Well to start definitely clear the CMOS to at least get your machine up and running. I have never had a problem clearing my CMOS without a dedicated clear button, all I have to do is take a conductive object (a flat-blade screwdriver is usually the 'goto') then short the CMOS prongs (use the screw driver to act as a connector between the two-- create continuity) so it has never really been an issue ( a 1-2 second task).

But about the motherboard, are you 100% sure it doesn't support an XMP? Asus's product page for that motherboard says otherwise:

"7. DDR4 3200+MHz(O.C.) 4 x DIMM, dual-channel Support XMP"

https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/ROG-STRIX-X370-F-GAMING/

I would double check just to see if maybe the XMP setting was accidentally skipped over or etc.

Good luck :)

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Under the dropdown menu of Overclock Tuner, the only options are Auto, Default, Manual, DOCP Standard, DOCP 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Do you where else I might be able to find the XMP option??? It's usually Overclock Tuner, right?

I tried updating BIOS by downloading the newest update on a flash drive, and I'm installing it right now from BIOS. It's taking forever, which worries me... I thought this computer would be really fast.

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

I just got the PC to restart by resetting the CMOS. In the Bios, it actually explains the differencees between the DOCP options.

DOCP Standard loads standardized unbiased settings

DOCP 1 loads the optimal settings for the system

DOCP 2 loads the optimal settings for the system via 2133 DRAM Ratio

DOCP 3 loads the optimal settings for the system via 2400 DRAM Ratio

DOCP 4 loads the optimal settings for the system via 2666 DRAM Ratio

DOCP 5 loads the optimal settings for the system via 2933 DRAM Ratio

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Ohhhhhhhh, I forgot you were on a Ryzen system. Yeah 2933 is your 3200, it down clocks so it is compatible.

Hope that helps, let me know if you have any other questions, good luck :)

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

I've only got 2666 RAM running alongside my Ryzen 5 1600 (on an AsRock board), and despite it being on the QVL for the mobo I can't even get it to run at 2666 stable (which is 'XMP profile 1' in my BIOS, the only option other than 'Auto'). Using this profile, the system always takes 4-5 consecutive attempts to boot up, shutting itself down repeatedly in between. 'Auto' runs it perfectly fine at 2400 though, so I'll just settle for that for now.

Bottom line, if you find a halfway acceptible profile that runs with Ryzen on a relatively recent BIOS version, just stick to it. It doesn't typically make a huge amount of difference under most basic user scenarios anyway, maybe a 4-5 FPS in demanding games.

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Most practical response I've gotten so far. Really appreciate it.

On YouTube, it seems everyone's raving about OCing to 4/4.1 Ghz, and again, it's hard to parse out the extreme overclockers from the pragmatists. Honestly I don't think any of them are pragmatists... you don't start a CPU channel for being practical, heh. And even if you don't have a YouTube channel about computers, just by virtue of the fact that you're building a PC, probably disqualifies you as pragmatic (other than being thrifty)... PC building naturally attracts a certain demographic.

As much as I appreciated the experience of building a PC for my first time and really gaining a deeper understanding of how all these parts work, I'm not a hobbyist. I don't see myself building another PC for thrills in the near future, so I really don't want my PC breaking for a while. Chances are by the time it's time for me to get a new PC, so much would've changed, I'd have to research everything all over again, and it's a very time consuming commitment.

My RAM is rated 3200 Mhz 14-14-14-34. I've set it to DOCP Standard... I don't understand how you have XMP on your motherboard. I thought AMD motherboards didn't have XMP... anyway, I have it set to DOCP Standard and 3200 Mhz 14-14-14-34, but I don't know how truly stable it is. Really only way to find out is by doing actual work on it (Premiere Pro).

I set the DRAM voltage to 1.375 from 1.35. My CPU voltage is set to 1.381V with an offset of .03125... I have no idea how to interpret the CPU voltage... I don't know if it means the voltage is 1.381, or if it's 1.381 + .03125.

Also the SOC is set to 1.150V, but the dropdown menu is set to "Auto." Once again, no idea what this means... whether it's set to 1.150V or Auto or both?? I don't understand why the Bios couldn't be clear.

So far I've passed RealBench for 15 minutes, Cinebench once, and Aida 64 for 28 minutes. I'm sure if I keep testing it, it'll fail at some point. I wanna know how it does with Premiere Pro, because I don't know if Premiere Pro will push the limits of this PC like RealBench anyway... but I could be wrong, since Premiere Pro uses multiple cores, as opposed to videogames that just use one core. And my previous computer of ten years kept freezing when editing videos, not to mention the fans were going berserk the whole time.

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

"As much as I appreciated the experience of building a PC for my first time and really gaining a deeper understanding of how all these parts work, I'm not a hobbyist. I don't see myself building another PC for thrills in the near future, so I really don't want my PC breaking for a while."

Yep, basically this for me too. THE main reason I prefer to build my own is to give myself more of a flexible/incremental upgrade path, precisely because I want (need!) my rigs to last me more than a few months each. I can't afford to be an 'enthusiast' per se; I get to build maybe one system (for myself at least) every 2-3 years, so I try to make it something mid-range that'll last me fairly well for the foreseeable without needing to crazily overclock anything.

The only scenario where I might be tempted to venture into that sort of territory was if pricing dictated that, say, a Ryzen 1600 was double or triple the price of a 1400 - in that case, I might be tempted to go cheaper and try a heftier performance boost.

In reality though, the price increases (for AMD especially) are so incremental as you move up the chain that for me it often just seems more sensible/easier to shell out an extra 20% for the next level up, and leave it at stock (or close to stock) settings rather than drop a tier and really crank it. I don't need insane benchmarks anyway; my workloads are fairly middling most of the time.

Re: my mobo, it's an AsRock ab350M Pro4, which evidently does have 'XMP' profiles (some AMD platforms call it XMP seemingly out of laziness, others come up with their own name for the same thing!) loaded into the BIOS by default, at least on reasonably recent versions.

I wasn't actually aware of that when i bought it, so in theory it's a nice bonus...but, as above, the appropriate XMP profile for my QVL-approved RAM doesn't seem stable with my current BIOS version (despite it correctly identifying the RAMs native speed and voltage). Go figure! My BIOS version isn't the most recent, admittedly, but since it basically works fine if I don't muck about too much with it, I'm happy to stick with an older relatively stable version for now.

Hope yours hangs tight anyway, sounds like it's going through the motions ok at the moment...knock on wood, etc.

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