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I know nothing.... need help

Jackison
  • 27 months ago

About to build my PC this weekend, don't want to pay for Windows. So I plan on trying Linux, I read up on it and I think I want to use Ubuntu but not sure which one of these 2 to download... What's the difference? https://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop

Also anything I need to be aware of, or are there any other Linux programs I should try?

Comments

  • 27 months ago
  • 2 points

LTS for a new user that doesn't plan on reinstalling or switching OS anytime soon.

There are a ton of other popular distros you may want to look into, like Mint or Fedora (I usually recommend Mint for beginners, personally), and more specialized distros like SteamOS and TAILS for gaming and privacy respectively.

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

I thought you could have multiple OS...? Like if I suck at this then I can just go buy MS and install it, right?

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

You can, what I mean is the other version has much shorter support so you would have to do more work keeping up with it. You would have that issue even if you dual boot.

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

So the LTS just needs to be loaded once? What does dual boot intail?

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

The LTS gets updates for longer, so you don't have to worry about major upgrades or reinstallations to continue receiving updates.

Dual boot just means having more than one OS installed. You install each on a separate drive or partition and then the bootloader should let you select which one you want to boot into.

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

LTS releases: Focus on stability.

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

Linux is a rabbit hole and I enjoy tinkering with things so it doesn't bother me to switch distros every now and then. To each their own though. Anything that says "LTS or stable" implies that it will have a longer support life than the most recent versions, but the trade-off is it doesn't get the bleeding edge kernels and package updates. Because there are so many variables it's difficult for any distribution to get it right 100% of the time whenever there are updates hence the reason for LTS. It's going to be running on rock solid testing and will update on a monolithic pace compared to distros that have a "rolling release" some of which can be updated possibly several times a day.

Some distros will simply give options for an "unstable" version which really doesn't mean it isn't stable it just means it's possibly less stable than the alternative. I takes a little while to digest all this.

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the info! It seems like a lot of work... might just be a MS shill and buy it as Linux seems like it's going to be fairly difficult

  • 26 months ago
  • 2 points

It's really not that difficult especially if all you plan to do is general web browsing and light linux supported gaming. Most modern non-microsoft browsers are fully supported in Linux. If you use Firefox, Opera, Chrome...you are good to go. There are other examples of this where Windows users are already using open source programs such as Libreoffice or OpenOffice. There are so many really good Linux desktop operating systems now that all you have to do is install it and use it. The learning curve is not really that bad but with most things you get what you put into it.

There are certainly differences from Windows, but once you get used to how it works it's not that bad. I'd say the biggest leap is understanding where programs come from. Basically you have "package managers" and you install programs from "repositories" either via a software center or terminal (think command prompt). If it's not in the repo then it becomes a more advanced issue and much of the time means you probably aren't going to get it. To me Ubuntu is confusing with this and that's why I would recommend something trimmed down and maintained like Elementary or Solus. They put out only packages that are currently maintained and not a bunch of googly gook that's been in the repos for a dozen years that may or may not work with your kernel. When I first got serious about using Linux about a year ago I thought I had to do 90% of this from a terminal and with Solus basically a 100% can be done from their software center. It's neat learning the terminal stuff but I wouldn't let it be a deal breaker.

If you aren't sure what you want to do just keep in mind that Linux operating systems mostly all run on old hardware some better than others depending on the hardware. So if you have an older computer that you want to experiment with then it's a great way to get your feet wet before jumping in on newer hardware. Another option would be Virtualbox or VmWare, but that doesn't sound like something a beginner would want to dive into. With Virtualbox you could have a Windows host computer and then have virtual computers with whatever "guest" operating systems you want. BSD, Linux, other Windows copies. It's not really intended for heavy usage but it's a good way to learn if you figure you'll like an operating system and if you do it right you can use those fairly well just not much gaming/3d support. Again it's not a deep as it probably sounds, once you get the hang of it you'll be addicted to installing operating systems.

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

WOW... Thank you for that seriously solid reply! I didn't know I could download Windows without actually paying for the License. So I have that on my PC right now just waiting to buy the permanent license. Someone else said I could have both OS but they'd have to be on seperate partitions... I'd definitely be interested in dwlding some sort of Linux OS. So you think Elementary or Solus would be a good place to get my feet wet? I also want to mention that I think I've worked with something like this before because my dad has some sort of Android TV box and he has like no clue how to work technology... so I have to fix it when it doesn't work. He uses the Kodi program and it has those terms on there, "repositories and package managers". And I think I could mess around with Linux on an older PC my mom has and doesn't use, not sure if it works tho might be fun to play with that and try to get Linux going on that. Could you PM me the link for the Linux software I should dwld? Also how do I partition my storage?

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

RE: Windows (running w/o activation)..umm yeah

RE: Kodi. Yes it's based on Linux/gnu though it's not really intended as a desktop operating system. Actually I guess it's more of a program than it is a operating system. It can be installed on just about anything. Kodi was developed for the XBOX more or less as a hack program and has evolved into a legit system that can be used as a media server/streamer. It's basically only held back because it's open source code means it's open to repos that put bootleg a lot of movies and what not. These are generally unreliable now due to the crackdowns by the man. Variants of Kodi would be LibreElec or OpenElec which are minimal operating systems that basically only run Kodi.

Rasberry Pi (runs Raspbian) is not the same thing as Kodi by any means but it's another thing you might dive into at some point. These can be fun projects I understand...many people will build "RetroPies" and run retro games on them.

RE: what you should do?

Really there is no right answer here. I recommend going over to Reddit https://www.reddit.com/r/linux4noobs/ and reading and maybe asking some questions there. There are also a ton of youtube videos on how to install these various operating systems though be warned a lot of them are installing as virtual computers but the same process applies.

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

Literally plan on playing LoL and doing internet stuff... still expect problems?

[comment deleted by staff]

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