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SuperSarah

20 months ago

UserBenchmarks: Game 130%, Desk 143%, Work 138% CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X - 100% GPU: Nvidia GTX 1080-Ti - 153.3% SSD: Samsung 970 Evo NVMe PCIe M.2 1TB - 301.9% USB: Samsung Flash Drive 128GB - 51.1% RAM: G.SKILL F4 DDR4 3600 C18 2x8GB - 105.7% MBD: Asus ROG STRIX X470-I GAMING

Is this about what I should expect?

Comments

  • 20 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes ... looks about right. Performance of the Samsung 970 Evo is higher than average (normally around 280%)--a good thing.

Have you overclocked your CPU?

  • 20 months ago
  • 1 point

No I haven't. Could you provide instructions or a link to instructions?

Thank you.

  • 20 months ago
  • 1 point

I believe Ryzen has some software overclocking tools but I'm not sure and I'm not familiar with them anyway, so I'll provide info on how to go about the traditional BIOS overclock.

There are three important figures: the base clock, the multiplier, and the voltage. Base clock should be left alone except in very specific circumstances, as it'll change the clock speeds of other components as well. You want to incrementally increase the multiplier and run a stress test after each increment to check for system stability. Once the system is no longer 100% stable, you have two options: dial it back to the last stable overclock, or raise the voltage. Raising the voltage can damage the CPU if it's raised too much so I would do some research on how far you should be raising the voltage on that CPU, unfortunately again I'm not familiar with Ryzen chips. After that, do the same thing. Increase the multiplier until it's not stable, and then either dial it back or raise the voltage a bit more until you're comfortable with where it's at.

It should go without saying that overclocking will increase your power consumption, so make sure your power supply and the VRMs on your motherboard are up for the task.

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