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New Gaming PC Build- Troubleshoot the Process

Cachey21

20 months ago

Hello, Recently built my first gaming PC last week. It fired right up once the HW was all put together. The next morning when ready to install the OS and other peripherals, it didnt boot up at all. After trying to do a few troubleshooting suggestions and eventually taking it all apart and putting it back together, still nothing. So I RMA'd the motherboard and the new one just came in and I am ready to go round 2.

Question: as you are building a PC, should you or can you try to fire up the HW to ensure it is connected and working appropriately at different stages of the build? And if so, at which steps do you suggest it be done?

My last build was CPU in MOBO, the RAM, then connected MOBO to case, then connected the wiring to the PSU (wires for PSU to MOBO and Case wiring for on/off, etc.), then the GPU and finally the drives and fans, connecting their wiring at that time.

Should I stop at certain spots and try to get a response everything is working, rather than get to the end and find out it is not and backtracking to see if its the drives, or this or that?

Thanks!

Comments

  • 20 months ago
  • 2 points

I like to bench test the CPU/Mobo/RAM outside the case first. I use the mobo box as a “test bench” and put the mobo on top of it right on the cardboard ... plug CPU, then RAM, then GPU, and last connect PSU (mobo, CPU, GPU if needed). Then plug PSU into power strip and then boot into CMOS/BIOS.

Then if there are any issues (error LEDs, no display), its easier to troubleshoot since everything is still outside the case — to clear CMOS, swap RAM, etc.

And if I see the BIOS screen, then it’s good and I turn off, unplug power, and proceed.

After that, I disconnect power and remove GPU. Then I take care of installing CPU cooler mount. If I’m installing M.2, I do it here. And then start installing everything in the case and the rest of the build.

Lastly, I use an anti-static mat with wrist band the whole time to ensure I’m always grounded. I see too many folks not practicing good grounding discipline.

Thoughts? Hope this helps.

  • 20 months ago
  • 1 point

Amazingly helpful, thank you! So newbie here, few other questions if you dont mind...

  1. Plugs that need to be connected outside, PSU to CPU slot on MOBO, PSU to 24 PIN, PSU PCIe to the GPU and RAM doesnt need anything thats good, then lastly the case plugs to turn off/on etc? Connect the monitor to the case and fire it up?

  2. Grounding - have an anti-static wristband, not mat, where do you recommend the clip go to ensure the best grounding method?

Thanks a bunch!

  • 20 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks for your questions.

  1. Yes on those power connections/cables. Yes on connecting the case front panel plugs--just need the POWER SW (power switch) plugged into the mobo so you can turn it on/off -- exception would be if your mobo has it's own power switch already on the mobo. Yes, plug the GPU into the PCI-e slot, plug in GPU power (depending on GPU), and then plug the monitor into the GPU's HDMI port (make sure it's all tight/snug). (note: if you're using an iGPU or APU, then you would not plug in a GPU and you'd plug the monitor into the mobo HDMI port).

  2. Here are some short videos on proper grounding.

Grounding Video #1

Grounding Video #2.

So, I normally connect the wrist strap to either my anti-static mat (there's a plug) or to the case of my the PSU for the build (ensuring it is first turned OFF, plugged into wall to ground it). At the beginning of the build, I do not have the PSU installed in the case yet. Then I do the "bench test" part of the PC build as roughly described above.

Then, when I'm ready to install the mobo into the case, I first unplug the PSU, disconnect the wrist strap, install the PSU in the case, plug the PSU back in (still OFF), and then connect the wrist strap to the case to ground again.

And then I install the mobo, and the rest of the components in the case.

  • 20 months ago
  • 1 point

Very, very helpful! Thank you so much

  • 20 months ago
  • 2 points

You can do a "breadboard" when you test everything on top of the mobo box to make sure everything works.

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