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YouTube channel?

JarJarJamal
  • 21 months ago

I’ve been toying with the idea of a YouTube channel for a while now. It would be centered around tech (Part/peripheral reviews, benchmarks, build guides, opinions, and setup reviews. I’m just not sure how I’d get it to take off you know? Because I can’t exactly go spend a lot of money to get parts and other stuff to review just for a couple of subscribers. I doubt I could get any companies to send me stuff to review with such a puny sub amount.

Thoughts?

Comments

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

well, a lot of poeple already do that, and I see some smaller channels focus on budget part/rig reviews which also helps them out because they wouldn't have to spend much to start a video. Take this gentleman for example: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUzjKyS5r72bfvPkA6GxpRg

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

What do you mean by take off? Like get a few thousand views or a few thousands subs in the first few weeks?

I personally just started a channel and posted a video on a pubg fix and got about 400 views and a couple of subs. I'm pretty happy with that as a first video and will build from there. I'm just trying to figure out how you want your channel to be.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

You don't necessarily need the parts to make a review of them, you can use photos and editing techniques to give a similar feel. If you really want to do that, just use your parts as a start or ask your friends if you could review their builds etc. Editing is really what makes a good video so if you can focus on that, people will come to your channel.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

I'd start with whatever tech you have already, or try to find cheap used parts to do some videos around cheap gaming or something. If you have friends who have other stuff you could borrow to do a video on, that is another possibility. And don't be afraid to ask companies for review samples, even if it's a loaner part where you send it back when you're done, start trying to build those relationships. Also make content that doesn't require a piece of hardware on hand, tech news discussion, tutorials, etc. I'd strongly advise against going anywhere near the reaction or response type videos unless you genuinely have something good to add to the discussion, lots of people do that just so they can tag a big channel in their video to get clicks, but it never ends well.

Bottom line, do it because you love it as a hobby, don't go in with the expectation that you will make money. If you love what you do and put the effort and time in to production quality and don't worry so much about having the latest graphics card on hand to review, it will show in your content.

[comment deleted]
  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Good ideas, thanks man

[comment deleted]
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