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What do the different PC parts do in relation to World of Warcraft (BFA)

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Topic

Yalderas 7 months ago

I've posted a few threads asking for a good budget WoW - only - PC build, due to the fact I don't have enough money yet, I will continue trying to gather more information to get the best I can get and know what I'm getting.

My question is this; What do the different PC parts do exactly, I am new to this scene but very eager to learn. I want to know so I can build my own based on my own opinion of what part I can get a cheaper version of and what part I need a nice one of.

CPU Motherboard Memory Storage Video Card Case Power Supply Other?

More specifically, if you could expand on how important any of these parts are or are not for playing World of Warcraft. I've heard that WoW is something single threaded or its CPU heavy or something, I don't know much else.

My goal is to put together my own parts list of a PC that can run WoW very well (high-ish settings) in good FPS (50+) with spending as little as possible.

My uneducated assumptions are that maybe I can skimp on the memory/storage because I'll only care to have 1 game on my PC. ( and if i want more later I could upgrade memory at that time). I don't know the difference between memory and storage. Probably get a nicer CPU, and possibly skimp on the motherboard bc all it does is connect things right? lol, I appreciate any feedback here very much, thank you. Also feel free to recommend a build you think would fit this description of PC ( even though this isn't the thread for it). =D

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Zeromus725 2 points 7 months ago

CPU

This is the main processor for your system. It performs millions or even billions of calculations a second. Within the last about 15 years, manufacturers have been putting additional cores into a CPU which allows it to perform multiple tasks at the same time. It is recommended for gaming to have 4 cores minimum. I would recommend you probably get somewhere from an Intel 8400-8600k or maybe a Ryzen 1400-1600x. Most people prefer Intel processors for gaming due to them generally having more power per-core than Ryzen and as you said yourself, WoW isn’t really optimized for massive amounts of cores.

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Motherboard

You’re sort of right about motherboards. They really only connect it all together. But I’m sure that you have mental trauma from school glue not sticking. What I’m trying to say is: don’t buy cheap garbage. However, you also don’t really need a $200 board. Take note that motherboards are built around CPUs; motherboards and CPUs need to be compatible.

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Graphics Card

A video/graphics card is pretty much exactly what it sounds like. It takes data given by the CPU and processes it into images that it pushes to your monitor. Look into Nvidia’s 1060 6GB and AMD’s Radeon 580 4/8GB if you’re doing 1080p.

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Memory VS Storage

Memory/RAM (random access memory) just holds temporary information. If you know anything about programming, it basically holds the variables the current program needs. For gaming these days it is recommended that you have 8-16 gigabytes of DDR4 memory. Memory doesn’t necessarily increase performance, but it can destroy performance if it is inadequate.

Storage is designed to be a more permanent solution. This is where you hold your files forever (or until your drive fails or you delete it). You will see two types of storage “containers”: HDD- hard disk drive and SSD- solid state drive. Pretty much all HDD’s are rectangular silver boxes that connect to your motherboard with a cable. SSD’s can be connected in the same way as HDD’s (through a SATA cable) or there are variants that go directly on the motherboard.

HDD

  • Very cheap
  • Large space
  • Slow

SSD

  • Expensive
  • Smaller Spaces
  • Very fast

Most people tend to get a SSD to hold their games and OS (operating system, I use Windows 10) AND a HDD for all other files.

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Case

Uh, it just holds it all within itself. Not really complex. You can get some with glass panels on the side so you can see inside. Other than that, just let PCPartPicker sort out which ones are compatible with your stuff. Choose this last. Also, dust filters are nice.

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Monitor

You should look at your monitor specs. Hz/Hertz is a unit of frequency. When we are talking monitors this is the maximum FPS you can display. Stuff like 1920x1080 (1080p) is your resolution. Higher resolutions are harder for graphics cards to handle. It is important to note if you have a G-Sync or Freesync enabled monitor. This can greatly impact your buying decision on graphics card. Bonuses include IPS(pretty colors) and curved(self-explanatory).

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If you have any questions just ask. :)

Also, if I have any glaring typos: I would appreciate you telling me.

Yalderas submitter 2 points 7 months ago

Wow, thank you for this response, it was very informative for me. So with storage, do I need a HDD and SDD or can I get by with just one, considering I'm only using this PC for a single purpose.

Zeromus725 1 point 7 months ago

You don’t necessarily need a SSD and HDD. HDDs are just a lot slower. This only really affects you when you’re loading things from your drive. So it would take awhile longer for your computer to start and it would take longer for your game to start. However, when it does start, you will no longer notice it causing problems. Personally, I just use a single one terabyte HDD. I suppose SSDs are a luxury not a necessity. I would recommend getting a one or two terabyte HDD from either Seagate or Western Digital. I think most games these days are 30-60 gigabytes. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/CbL7YJ/seagate-barracuda-2tb-35-7200rpm-internal-hard-drive-st2000dm006

It’s been a long time since I have played Warcraft, but I remember when you went through a portal or started a dungeon it would have a rather long loading screen. I’m not a developer of WoW, however, I believe when these screens are up it is trying to do two things. (1.) Connect to the server or instance and (2.) Possibly load the area from your drive. Really, I just think it’s a networking thing. I would be interested to see someone actually test this, but it doesn’t seem too important.

I’m not sure if you care, but as a bonus I’m going to explain to you the difference between digital sizes. It goes down to the ones and zeros. One single digit can be a 1 or 0. (If you want to know why that is or how the CPU interprets it, just ask.) This is known as a “bit”. Due to the way we programmers group these it makes sense to have a group of 8 bits and call this group a “byte”. A “kilobyte” is 1024 bytes, but most people just say 1000. It’s 1024 because of the way we stack bits based upon powers of 2 (binary). A “megabyte” is 1024 kilobytes. A “gigabyte” is 1024 megabytes. A “terabyte” is 1024 gigabytes. A “petabyte” is 1024 terabytes.

So:

  • Bit = 1 bit (duh, lol)
  • Byte = 8 bits
  • Kilobyte = 8,000 bits
  • Megabyte = 8,000,000 bits
  • Gigabyte = 8,000,000,000 bits
  • Terabyte = 8,000,000,000,000 bits
  • Petabyte = 8,000,000,000,000,000 b

That’s how data and computing is scaling! A terabyte is A TRILLION ones/zeros. Crazy right? I believe the prefix after peta is exo. Not really sure. I also think it’s interesting to note that internet bandwidth is measured in bits instead of bytes. That annoys me, but it isn’t really here nor there.

That might be a lot to take in, but you only really need to know the first and second paragraph. You do NOT need to remember the bit ladder. If you got it, great. If you didn’t, great. If you are confused or have more questions: feel free to ask! :)

Gilroar 1 Build 2 points 7 months ago

It’s been a long time since I have played Warcraft, but I remember when you went through a portal or started a dungeon it would have a rather long loading screen. I’m not a developer of WoW, however, I believe when these screens are up it is trying to do two things. (1.) Connect to the server or instance and (2.) Possibly load the area from your drive. Really, I just think it’s a networking thing. I would be interested to see someone actually test this, but it doesn’t seem too important.

It is pulling the instance from mostly the drive. SSD are a major benefit in this title that will quite litterally save you 1-2 minutes per loading screen for larger instances over a hard disk and will even scale noticably with NVME drives over SATA.

And raids will load even longer with a larger performance delta between the types.

Zeromus725 1 point 7 months ago

Thanks for confirming my theory, Gilroar! Back when I played last SSDs weren’t as popular as they are now. I only ever played on a HDD.