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Windows 10 and Ubuntu question

caparts
  • 21 months ago

I use both Windows 7 and Linux (mostly, Ubuntu). I want to start using Windows 10 - long story, why.... and no, it's not cuz I like it. :) I use Ubuntu as the linux distribution just because it has the most info/how to instructions for tasks - plus, I am familiar with it. No other reason. I suspect Arch Linux and maybe Fedora is better, how knows.

Anyway, here's the question. I am looking at two options with a new build (builds?). One, is to just build one computer - easier, cheaper - and I would install the two operating systems on separate SSDs. This is still, technically, dual-booting, but on two SSDs. No, my question isn't 'how do I do that?' There's a lot of hits when you search that. I'll figure it out if I go that route.

My question is, what about TWO BUILDS? That is REALLY expensive but I think it is the logically best solution. But, I don't know if I can afford that. :) But, I need to be talked into using just ONE COMPUTER. :)

But, the 2 computer solution makes a lot of sense - I like the idea of having both Windows and Ubuntu there - at all times, when I need. I guess SSDs help in that they are faster than HDDs now so I wouldn't have to wait as long for the other OS to start up. But, it requires shutting everything down and stopping what you're doing in that OS. What if you just have to do some minor task in the OS? - what a pain.:)

Yes, I know about Wine and VirtualBox/VMWare/VMs but I think they open another can of worms. You have to worry about running into compatibility issues, having enough resources if you use the VM and possibly, speed or hangups - in which, something is not working for some reason. Although, yes, that is an option, anyway. If I go with just one machine, I might try that.

Is there some idea in which I should use two computers? Do you use one computer to run Linux and Windows 10 - and find it fine? I am hoping for encouragement to use just one computer, I guess. :) I suppose the best argument to just use one is that I can invest for the 'best' parts if just financing one machine? Right?

Thanks for reading and offering any advice/ideas.

Comments

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

You can upgrade to windows 10 for free I believe, just use the windows media creation tool, and enter you win 10 access key. There should be an option to upgrade from an existing version, it will upgrade and shouldn't screw up linux. But mess with linux there's no telling what windows will do (mainly freak out and go unbootable).

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Ahh, you don't need seperate SSDs. If you have a big enough SSD, you can partition it into multiple drives and have Ubuntu/Windows 10 on each one. If you want to run both side by side though, unfortunately the only way you can do this would be through VMs or on seperate computers. I've wanted to run Linux/Windows on seperate monitors using the same hardware but it's just not possible at this time. I'd probably say use seperate computers, Linux, as you're probably well aware of, doesn't really need stupidly high end hardware to run on. I'd recommend something like this (I'm assuming your prices are in USD):

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Pentium Gold G5500 3.8GHz Dual-Core Processor $69.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard Gigabyte - H310M A Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $50.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill - Value 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2666 Memory $65.98 @ Newegg
Storage ADATA - XPG SX6000 128GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $34.99 @ Newegg
Case Cooler Master - MasterBox E300L MicroATX Mini Tower Case $34.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA - BR 450W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $29.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $286.93
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-09-05 02:12 EDT-0400
  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

I really would like to go with the 2 computers but maybe I use that $300 for extra memory/RAM or a larger SSD or towards the cpu to make it a much more powerful machine - if I just get one computer? What do you think?

I know that is the best and most convenient way, though. I know I'll run into situations in which I wish I could just leave the Linux or Windows OS running as is and just 'switch' to another computer and the other OS. Hmmmm.... if only money grew on (my) trees outside my door.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

I think what it really comes down to is how much will you use Windows and Linux at the same time? and how often will you switch from one to the other?

If you really use them both concurrently, or alternate very often, two machines makes some sense. Otherwise I think two machines is excessive, assuming money doesn't flow out of the tap in your house. I dual boot Windows and Linux on my 2700X build, but I'm in linux about 99% of the time and I only need Windows infrequently. If I had to use windows a little more often than I do, I'd probably run it in VIrtualBox, which is really very simple and VirtualBox is free. Any Ryzen or Coffee Lake build with 16GB or more memory will be able to run windows in a VM without any real hassle. Of course, if you're trying to game on the Windows side, that might be non-optimal. VMware runs Windows better than VirtualBox, but it's not free, of course.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for your replies, guys. I also use Linux the majority of the time. But, I would use Windows from time to time - mostly MS Office programs and sometimes when working with others (friends and co-workers). I might use a VM but I still want a 'real' system (i.e. real install) just in case.

Btw, I'm really learning towards a Ryzen build - aiming or planning on getting a 2700X - I would have bought one already except I'd like to get one used and the prices I'm finding are not as low as I'd like. : ) OR, alternatively, the sellers are not local. I would travel to get it but the travel costs boost the price and I don't want to use my car to go there. :)

I'm also debating the form factor to go with - ATX or ITX.

Anyway, this question was about what to do with a two-OS setup. I think you guys are right - 2 systems will cost some money unless I get a cheap system for one of them - I might as well just deal with dual-booting. However, I think I will dual boot on two separate drives. It's easiest and you avoid potential problems when you are updating Windows and/or you have a boot issue. I really would like to get 32 GB of memory - still want to try the VM setup and an 8-core cpu and 32 GB of RAM sounds very appealing for that. However, this will make the build expensive. I doubt I can afford 2 computers if I ultimately decide to go this way. :)

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