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Topic

versatilesoldier 6 days ago

I have a question about motherboards and RAM speeds supported. If I have 16 gb of ram at 3000 mhz and my motherboard is said to only support 2933 or something to 3200 not 3000 is this ok?

Comments Sorted by:

dwang040 2 Builds 1 point 6 days ago

yes, 3000MHz ram will work with the motherboard. The speed will just be 2933MHz. HOWEVER, I highly recommend you research your motherboard and the ram kit to make sure that they are indeed compatible to avoid any boot issues/ stability issues. There are ram kits that are specifically at 2933MHz and 3200MHz, so if you're unsure about the compatibility (and nobody here or another site has an answer), I would suggest looking at a different kit.

versatilesoldier submitter 1 point 6 days ago

Thanks for your answer! If you could help me a bit more I am thinking about getting 2x8 gb of g. skill aegis ddr4 3000 mhz with an ASRock - Z270 Killer SLI/ac ATX LGA1151 Motherboard. Thanks for your help and time!

dwang040 2 Builds 1 point 6 days ago

As you can see by the compatibility list, the aegis ram kit will work with the ASRock motherboard.

kschendel 1 Build 1 point 6 days ago

Time for another MHz vs MT/s rant! All these numbers you've listed are in million transfers per second, MT/s. If you go into a tool like CPU-Z and look at the memory frequency in MHz you'll see that it's half the transfer rate. 3000 MT/s RAM clocks at 1500 MHz. DDR = Double Data Rate, two transfers per clock.

This units mishandling caused another pcpartpicker poster a day or so of grief recently, thinking that his memory was running too slow when in fact it was at rated speed.

versatilesoldier submitter 1 point 6 days ago

Wait... what does this exactly mean xd

kschendel 1 Build 1 point 6 days ago

It means that there's no such thing as 3000 MHz memory. There's 3000 MT/s memory, which runs at a clock speed of 1500 MHz.

dwang040 2 Builds 1 point 6 days ago

I guess it's just "easier" to say 3000MHz for oc speeds than it is to ask if a ram is capable or running at 1500MHz or what the actual stock/ oc speed is. But it is a "less unknown" (compared to the avg person just building a pc) concept that ddr stands for double data rate, and that indeed, the speed of the stick is half of advertised stock/ oc speeds.

kschendel 1 Build 1 point 6 days ago

Why not just ask for 3000 MT/s memory, matching the DDR4 number, since that's what you want anyway? Transfer rates aren't clock frequencies. You don't go around saying yards when you mean meters, or gallons when you are talking about area measures. It mystifies me that people think MT/s is so hard, when what's really hard is the confusion the misuse of units causes.

dwang040 2 Builds 1 point 6 days ago

I would just blame that up to marketing/ common usage :shrug_emoticon:. Go on Amazon, Newegg, any tech channel and they just list everything as 2100MHz, 3000MHz, 3600MHz. Right, corsair lpx 3200MHz. I can't say I've seen any ram stick advertised/ listed as MT/s... Ex g skill trident 4000 MT/s. Go to the specifications and it'll say "Tested speed: 4000MHz." Though, it's possible that it was done like this to avoid confusion as again like your example. Why don't more people use MT/s, idk. I say MHz since that's the "standard" on many sales websites, spec pages, and even here on pcpp.