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is a high end build really necessary??

hamhead1

3 months ago

So in anticipation of Ryzen 3000, I sold my R7 1700 cpu, leaving me with a "crappy" PC that I pieced together as a stop-gap.

I don't game at all I have no time or interest. Even if I force myself to play a popular game, I just get bored within 15 minutes and uninstall it. Keep in mind I used to be super addicted playing 10 hours a day. Maybe I just grew out of it.

On the Ryzen PC I was doing mainly photo editing on Photoshop CC about 3-4 hours every other day. Specs: R7 1700 no OC B350 mobo 2x8gb 2933 mhz ddr4 gtx 1070 256 ssd

Everything on this PC was fast, no lag at all doing anything.

Now I've been using this "crap" PC for a few days and I've come to the realization that I don't need a fast PC.

Specs of "crap" PC: celeron 3900 2.8ghz dual core 2x8gb 3200mhz ddr4 z270 mobo gtx 1050 2gb 128 ssd 2tb hdd

Other than program installation, initiation, and startup taking a little longer (I'm talking just seconds) and when using Photoshop the only function that is slower than Ryzen PC is when I'm cropping and moving the entire image around its just a little choppy. THATS IT.

How I use my PC is very simplistic though so maybe that helps. No bloat software, 3-5 chrome tabs in the back and Photoshop CC in the front.

After using this PC for a few days I completely lost all desire to upgrade to Ryzen 3000....

Comments

  • 3 months ago
  • 5 points

If you don't need it, you don't need it. Many people don't need high-end PCs, some do; it's all up to your use case.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

They wouldn't really be called high-end if they were for "average" or "typical" applications and performance expectations.

Don't forget the application-specific aspects, though. You can have something that's high-end with respect to particular uses, rather than "high-end with respect to other general desktop devices."

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

In a nut shell going for a mid range build will deliver a great gaming experience and work well for most people. Sure top end PCs work better but you get diminishing returns on amount spent vs performance. A $2400 PC will out perform a $1200 PC but it won't be literally double the performance in gaming.

On the same time bottom end hardware is also a bad value normally for the cost may not show how bad they can perform. Look at the cost vs performance of a GTX 1050 ti vs a RX 580 these days. Spend $25 more about 16% more in cost and get 85% more performance.

Your current PC of a r7 1700 with a GTX 1070 is actually well matched and should play any current game well.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Im really surprised the celeron handles photoshop and general web surfing so well.

Again, I dont do any gaming and I got the gtx 1050 used for really cheap when GPUS were super expensive during the mining years (1/3 to 1/4 the price of a RX580 at the time).

The only thing I want to improve is the file saving time for PSD files. Is there any way to speed that up dramatically? I already have a SSD. The saving time is pretty comparable to my R7 1700 so I dont know if it is a CPU thing.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

The only thing I want to improve is the file saving time for PSD files. Is there any way to speed that up dramatically? I already have a SSD

I suppose you are looking for a NVMe SSD then for a faster drive. Not sure how long photoshop layered image files take to save (PSD) and not sure how much of an improvement it will be. If you were serious on it then a samsung NVMe would be something to look at as they are known for the fastest speeds especially on the pro version for write speeds. For general game loading that extra speed isn't a huge difference over a modern standard 2.5" sata SSD. You also may not be able to put it in your pentium system depending on motherboard but more likely to be added to the Ryzen PC.

Again, I dont do any gaming and I got the gtx 1050 used for really cheap when GPUS were super expensive during the mining years (1/3 to 1/4 the price of a RX580 at the time).

I remember that, it was a bad time for PC building as ram was also way over priced too.

[comment deleted]
  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Well depends on image size and number of layers, some mega projects can be rather large but I am not sure. Even if he is saving to a sata SSD now and does upgrade to a NVMe the real world difference in speed might not even be that big anyhow. Even a few megabytes will save rather fast to a HDD too. Though HDD to SATA ssd was a large change but not nearly as big for SATA ssd to NVMe in real world loading times.

[comment deleted]
  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

On my R7 1700 system it was using a Sandisk 256 SATA SSD. And when saving to that for each PSD file it would take around 10 seconds, which is quite a bit since I am waiting for it to save to work on the next photo.

On the celeron system it was similar, on a Gigastone 128 SATA SSD.

my PSD files are small with 10 or less layers

will a NVMe reduce the save time to say 2 seconds?

[comment deleted]
  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

is a high end build really necessary??

No. But are human beings only concerned with "necessities"? No. Are individuals concerned with sticking to necessities? Sure.

Depends on your use case and values as a user. At work I use a 6 year old i7, integrated video, 8GB of RAM. It's fine. At home I use something quite a bit more current/powerful and that's how I like it.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

All depends on what your doing with it. If your not stressing your smaller build, then don't sweat it.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Anything high end is never necessary. I also used to be similar to yourself in that I felt like I grew out of gaming, especially after my wife giving birth to our second son. With that second son, however, came a much bigger and unexpected tax return. I used that extra portion to build myself a high end system and suddenly, I'm really in the mood to play many of the games that I missed over the years.

That said, I probably could have spent half that money and been happy with a mid range system. If you want to save the money and are happy with what you have, more power to you.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I recently bought a dozen refurbished business class 11" 2n1 laptops to issue to temp employees this summer at work. These are from 2013 and are configured with an i5-3437U. 1.9-2.9GHZ 2C/4T Ivy Bridge CPU. In terms of CPU power, this isn't much to get excited about in 2019, but these have all been configured with 8GB RAM and 256GB SSD's. The result, is these are very responsive/functional computers for general computing and web browsing. They run office apps, chrome, etc, all well enough. Sure there's more lag loading stuff similar to your experience, but it is functional. I found myself similarly surprised with just how little is required for a decent-enough computing experience.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Honestly, if I could have built a $500 used parts PC in 2016 and pocketed all the money I've put towards my PC ever since, I would have done that in a heartbeat. I like my PC but its VASTLY overkill for what I want out of it and I still regret spending as much as I did on it. I guess the silver lining in my current build is that its not changing anytime soon.

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