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Completely new to this, need advice

tpa777
  • 71 months ago

Hey guys, I recently decided I wanted to build my first gaming rig, as Im gonna have some extra income to spend. Problem is, I have no experience with this and have no clue whether this setup is compatible or not, or worth the price. Ideally, $920 is the most I would like to spend. If theres any problems with this, or if anyone sees any parts that I could spend less on/should switch out, the advice would be much appreciated.

Heres the parts list: https://pcpartpicker.com/user/tpa777/saved/N33mP6 Thanks

Comments

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi,

The first thing I recommend is going with an Intel rather than an AMD. In my experience, they are pretty close, but to get the full potential out of most AMD cards you have to overclock. If you don't really want to overclock, I would suggest going with an i3. I use a i3 4130 in my rig, and I have a graphics card that is just a tad less dank than yours.

Second, I'm not sure about that power supply. Most cards need 30 amps on the 12 volt rail, and newegg is telling me that you only get 20 on either of the rails. I use a Corsair CS750M. It's very much overkill for my build, but you would do fine with a 500 watt corsair PSU. Some people don't like Corsair's PSUs but mine has served me just fine.

RAM is RAM, so if you can find the same size and speed for cheaper, there's a pretty low chance that it will work any worse than what you have. My RAM is a little slower, 1600, but no problems so far.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

You need to look at the CAS and voltage on the RAM as well.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Aye, the site should help though. If you set it to the only compatible option, which I believe is the default option anyway, you shouldn't have too much of a problem getting RAM that fits.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Not really, there isn't a compatibility for CAS it is what it is like Disk speed.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey,

Thanks for the advice. Just a few questions: Is the difference between a dual-core and quad-core important to someone such as myself? I would use the computer to mostly play games and view media, and not much else.

Im assuming it is not that big of a deal, so I changed to the i3 4150, and even downgraded my graphics card to save a bit.

I just have one concern: switching to the Intel makes my motherboard no longer compatible. Do you have any recommendations as to what I could use that would fit?

http://pcpartpicker.com/user/tpa777/saved/N33mP6

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

It depends if you want to do ATX or micro ATX. They will perform pretty much identically, but micro is generally cheaper with less features, and ATX has more room. For example, I have a micro, which doesn't have a USB 3.0 port and only 1 PCIE slot. Unless you're planning to run crossfire, then you may want to go with micro (someone correct me if I am wrong). The regular ATX would just leave more room for upgrades later, but that card will last you a looong time, and if you ever wanted to upgrade to an i5, it fits in the same slot anyway.

I use a MSI B85M-P33. However, in most cases the motherboard doesn't matter a ton as long as it's functional. You shouldn't have to pay more than $70 for a mobo.

The only other ways you might be able to save some money is by downgrading your case or by trying to find a deal on a monitor. I was shopping around and I saw serviceable monitors at Staples for about 100. You can probably find a better monitor for the same price online, but I don't think that you're going to get a monitor for much less than that.

You can get cheapo cases and they won't affect your performance at all, but it will seem flimsy and sometimes they don't have as much air flow. So I would stick with your case unless you really want to cut down on the spending.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry, I just realized I didn't answer your question about cores. Honestly, multiple cores really depend on what you're playing. Newer games will generally be coded to take advantage of more cores, while older games won't. I believe it is that clock speed trumps number of cores, but more cores is better too :)

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