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Need help building a 3d modeling + Real time rendering PC

andresroppa
  • 70 months ago

Can anyone give me some direction, suggestions on a build for 3D modeling. I'd also like to take advantage of real time rendering software.

I'm an industrial designer using Rhino + Vray and Solid Works. My budget in in the $1200 - $1500 range. I made a test build including basic components, but my experience with hardware (motherboard, CPU and mostly video cards) is almost null.

thanks in advance for any help.

http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/user/andresroppa/saved/pctWGX

andre

Comments

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

its private, cant see it

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point
  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

Something like this..

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor $369.95 @ Vuugo
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 76.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler $36.98 @ Newegg Canada
Motherboard Asus P8Z77-V LK ATX LGA1155 Motherboard $134.98 @ Amazon Canada
Memory Corsair 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory $155.98 @ Newegg Canada
Storage Crucial M550 256GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $164.99 @ Amazon Canada
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.95 @ Vuugo
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Superclocked ACX Video Card $344.99 @ NCIX
Case Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case $49.99 @ NCIX
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA NEX 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $74.99 @ NCIX
Optical Drive Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer $16.79 @ DirectCanada
Operating System Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) $99.79 @ DirectCanada
Total
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available $1509.38
Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-08-01 13:08 EDT-0400
  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

That's awesome, many thanks Hazarded.

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

Intel Core i7-3770K: Perhaps you meant Intel Core i7-4790 and a matching Z97 chipset based mobo. Unless there is some reason for suggesting the older technology "Ivy Bridge" processor?

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

Warlock is right. Not sure why you'd go third-generation and with an obsolete socket.

The other thing to keep an eye on is to buy the i7-4790K (note the "K") if you may want to overclock later, which he forgot when he put the CPU number.

You might consider Caviar Black if you will need to put videos in real time onto the mass storage. If you will always work on them on the SSD and then move then later (or move them to the SSD before you edit them), then caviar blue is fine.

You may be able to find a less expensive SSD than that, especially if you look out for rebates.

You might consider seeing about higher speed RAMs as they may or may not cost more and they may help the system run faster.

Is this for a workplace or home (or perhaps home workplace LOL), and how sensitive will you or others around you be to the system's noise? From reviews that's a quiet...ish case. Also, no filters - if you will use this in a dusty environment it may get bad. If you look around and have patience you can probably get a quieter case with intake filters for $50 after rebates.

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

Check into what cards will accelerate Vray, and see if the AMD FirePro cards are good with Rhino. The FirePro cards are extremely good with SolidWorks, so if that were your only requirement I'd use it unless SolidWorks has consumer/gaming cards on its list of recommended / certified hardware. If they aren't, well it might still work... but you may have strange viewport consistencies or unsupported features.

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

Many thanks for the pointers aackthpt.

andres

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

You're welcome. And just be glad you aren't running the kind of CAD that requires Quadro. Talk about paying too much for handicapped hardware.... and here I am building a Quadro box to use at home... sigh Hahaha.

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

Well I am a noob in this hardware world, so I have been reading a lot on these cards vs gaming cards. I guess I could actually benefit from the performance of a Quadro, but after reading a lot in forums, I'm not sure the price is worth it. Many, many sighs ... this has been so complicated to put together.

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

Quadros actually aren't (necessarily) fast... they are accurate. You're mostly paying for the extra support you're getting with "pro" cards, in the forms of drivers certified to work with various professional applications, and drivers optimized for a specific application. But in real, for the areas they do support, especially when compared price-for-price the Quadro line is slower than the regular/gaming card line. Poke around on Passmark's benchmarks for video cards if you want to see that demonstrated.

The reason I say not necessarily fast there is that while the hardware of the non-pro cards is technically faster (a lot, actually), it turns out that a lot of CAD performance has to do with driver optimizations. In some cases slower hardware with a better driver runs faster than faster hardware with a poorer driver.

I did a build with a Quadro, and have a couple more on tap, because while they do work with non-pro cards the stuff I do for work only has pro cards as recommended hardware and I have seen some strange inconsistencies (e.g. pre-select highlighting not working correctly) using a gaming card. But it was an older gaming card, so shrug. Anyway I would have gone with FirePro becuase it's very quick for one of our applications, but for the other main application the performance is crap - so you're kind of forced into the Quadro.

My solution to the Quadro being extremely expensive is to buy one from the previous generation used from eBay. A bit of patience can probably net what you want or need at a reasonable price.

Building PCs may seem daunting at first, but do one and you'll be hooked. Also, after coming up to speed on the hardware one time, it's relatively easy to just check in every few years to see what's new.

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

Great! thanks for this info, it's too helpful ... btw this is more or less the build I am going for:

http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/user/andresroppa/saved/pctWGX

I still haven't ordered the CPU and Mother board ... Hope I didn't blow it with the rest ... if you think I am making a big mistake here, please let me know ;)

thanks again

[comment deleted]

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