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Would my PSU be able to power a Gigabyte GTX 760 OC?

sevenlions
  • 81 months ago

Will a 430w PSU (80+ Bronze certified) be able to power a Gigabyte GTX 760 OC rev.2.0? I let one of my friends make a build for me (fairly new to building PC's) he said get this PSU(http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...) Along with this GPU(http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...) I've already ordered the parts but I'm worried the PSU will not be able to handle the GPU... HELP me :c

Other Thoughts: PCPARTPICKER said my build would use at least 343w should I be worried?

Comments

  • 81 months ago
  • 2 points

You gave us incomplete links and I can't see which PSU you're talking about. Budget units have a harder time meeting demand at room temperature in a hot PC. I'm guessing that it's a Corsair CX.

I'd say it's borderline. GPU makers usually overstate the power needed for their cards. It gives them leeway when people buy $20 power supplies that struggle to reach the power on the label or can't provide clean, stable watts.

It's good that PCPartPicker gave you the 343w number, they're usually a little high for the same reasons but more accurate than the video card makers. You didn't give us a PCPartPicker link to your build, so it's harder to make an estimate. I'd be more comfortable if you had a 450w PSU.

Try this power calculator and see what it says http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp In my experience, it runs 50 watts too high but that may not be true for everyone and it will give you another opinion. I definitely don't think you need to go higher than 500w if PCpartPicker quoted 353w.

  • 81 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry about the links , I can send you my build if it would help give me a better estimate! http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1nB42 for some reason PCpartpicker doesn't have the haswells on inventory yet but the CPU i've ordered is a i5 Haswell 4670k

  • 81 months ago
  • 1 point

That processor doesn't show up for you because it won't work with your motherboard.

MSI B75MA-E33 Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard and Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor are not compatible.

MSI B75MA-E33 Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard has an onboard USB 3.0 header, but the NZXT M59 - 001BK ATX Mid Tower Case does not have front panel USB 3.0 ports.

In any case, let's assume that the new motherboard draws approximately the same power. Intel says that chip draws 65 watts, PCPartPicker adds 19 watts to that as a safety cushion for 84 watts.

So your power supply is a Corsair CX430 as I guessed. And the only vendor is Best Buy, who says it's discontinued and not available.

Game over. Bad power supply, bad motherboard. The good news is that the CX430 V2 is $33 cheaper. The bad news is that it's still 430w(and it's a CX series Corsair. The TX is better but costs more).

Instead of buying the Corsair, there's the XFX P1-450S-X2B9. It's a better PSU, has the 20 more watts that makes me comfortable, and costs only $7 more than your original choice. Another good one is the Capstone 450. It has 80+ Gold efficiency and is also well reviewed.

I see nothing worthwhile between the $20 Corsair ($30 for modular) and the two I've suggested in 450w or 500w. Oh, there's a PC Power & Cooling PPCMK3S500. That's $52, a dollar cheaper than your original Corsair.

So...

  • PC Power & Cooling PPCMK3S500 $52
  • XFX P1-450S-X2B9 $59
  • Capstone 450 $59

For myself, I would buy the Rosewill because it will be the cheapest to run. I believe that you would be safe with 430 watts, but I'd prefer to see you bump it to 450 and also get a higher quality PSU for the about same price as your original choice.

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

I am highly confident the corsair could run it, but its also a good option to run a higher quality psu if you don'tt mind spending a little more. At least the corsair wont blow up like some raidmax, coolmax, or diabloteks. The V2 is a better improved version over the first version.

I don't think it really matters if the case has front panel usb 3.0 ports. Its more of a matter of "utilizing available features" since there's usb 3.0 ports on the motherboard in the back.

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't think the USB ports matter either, he had missed the warning for the cpu/mb so I thought I'd let him know about the other warning as well.

I have a grudge against the Corsair CX. People are spending over a hundred dollars on a case or keyboard, and another hundred on various fans and coolers, then dropping a $35 power supply in there. The price point that the Corsair CX occupies makes it the default "decent" power supply, and it's adequate but not very good. I feel that the PSU is the most important item since it provides the power for everything else. Minimum normal retail price should be $50 for a 400w PSU and go up $5 for every additional ten watts.

The Corsair AX, TX and HX are great PSUs but the CX doesn't deserve its popularity. I'm on a campaign to make the Rosewill CAPSTONE-450 the default power supply for people looking to cut corners.

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

I think its a matter of budget. If you are building a $600 gaming computer then a CX may be all you can afford but if you're building a $1000 system then you can afford a better psu. For basic users/non gamers I use antec basiq 350/vp350 since these systems don't need a lot of power; the web browsing machine.

  • 81 months ago
  • 2 points

I know it's recommended that I have 500w but I want to know if I can still be able to power my gpu

  • 81 months ago
  • 1 point

The corsair 430w will provide plenty of power. If pcpartpicker says 343w, that is the maximum your build should ever pull.

  • 81 months ago
  • 1 point

Many companies rate the wattage of their CPU at 65-70F. Inside a hot PC, they have trouble reaching and maintaining that rating without generating a lot of noise on the line. PCPartpicker's estimates are on the high side, and that gives you some safety. Even the worst 600w PSU can pull 400w. But if you get something like a Raidmax, Diablotek or Coolmax 450w you might not make 343w in the real world.

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

Yup, as long as its a quality and known brand, then it should be able to pull its wait. I will never touch raidmax, diablotek, or coolmax. A long time ago, I actually bought a cheap $10 raidmax to replace a psu in a old dell computer and it exploded. Lesson learned.

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