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$600 Silent Skylake Streambox

Goal

This build is for streaming 1080p video to YouTube from an external source without extra high quality pictures. Why? This build runs on the iGPU provided in the CPU, which isn't powerful enough to render multiple of them, for example, Awesomesauce Network's live show Booted, where users submit their PCs for review, and they typically send in ultra high res pictures. But, this build can handle lower resolutions quite well without upgrades.

CPU: The Core i5 6500 is powerful enough to render out the HD video for streaming you'll need. Of course, you'll need a camera (and depending on how you connect it up, you'll also need a capture card) for if you want to do a live show.

CPU Cooler: You may be wondering, WHY A CPU COOLER IN A BUILD WITH NO CPU OC SUPPORT?!?!?!?!?! Well, in order to acheive total silence, you'll need one of these or better, as the fan spins really slow (I can seriously see the fan blades moving, it's that slow) and it dissipates heat properly while streaming.

Motherboard: So why this motherboard? Because it is the cheapest motherboard available with 4 RAM slots. Just in case you want/need to step up from this amount of RAM in the future, you'll be able to add more RAM cheaper than to just buy a whole new set of larger capacity DIMMs.

RAM: Cheap, fast, reliable RAM. 8GB is plenty and possibly overkill for streaming.

SSD: Why just an SSD? Why not the popular SSD + HDD combo? The name of this guide should tell you: Silence. HDDs always make noise, while SSDs never do. 480GB should be enough for some local video storage, and you can keep archives uploaded to YT in case you need to free up some space.

Case: The N200 is a decent case for cable management and airflow in mATX form factor. It has a neutral outer appearance, so it won't look weird in an office. Also, with the proper fans, this case will allow the build to be silent.

PSU: This PSU doesn't have much wattage, which is OK since you most likely won't be running a power hungry GPU in this system (possibly never). It also does come with a PCIE 6 pin cable for lower-end GPUs. You'll want this to face fan side down, as the cables are short.

Fan: Why is this even here? Because Noctua is known as the brand for silence and quality. Just one of these fans will be enough, as the H7 will cover all other neccessary component cooling.

How to build the stupid thing. (IMPORTANT!)

I've recently streamed building a system very similar to this one.

If you don't feel like sitting through 2+ hours of stream, you can simply read this. I did make lots of errors in the video, however. Make sure you read this either way:

Start by going through the normal build process, you can install the PSU into the case, CPU and RAM into the motherboard, and fan into the case. Make sure to uninstall the included fans unless you really need them. Also, install the Noctua as an intake on the top of the front panel. I recommend you just use the regular screws until another day so you can get the build running. You can remove the front panel by a hole on the bottom of it. Don't worry, it won't break.

This is where things get tricky. Install the H7 onto the motherboard with the provided manual that comes in the box with the thermal compound and mounts. Personally, I recommend taking off the fan before installing it, then you can reinstall the fan when you're done. Inside of the case accessories bag, use the included adapter to screw in all the standoffs required. Tighten them down COMPLETELY. Install the motherboard's IO shield with the audio jack holes closest to the PCI expansion slots. DO NOT INSTALL THE MOTHERBOARD YET. Route the CPU power cable through the back and up through the top to get to where the IO shield is, as this is near the CPU power plug. Also, grab the ULN adapter and extension cable provided with the Noctua fan, plug in the ULN adapter and then the extension. Route the long cable to the same place as the CPU power cable. Plug them in to the motherboard before installing the motherboard. Now, there is one standoff screw in the top left corner you cannot get to, as this case doesn't have much clearance in that area for it with this cooler installed. So why not install the cooler afterwards? Why did you make me go through this pain for nothing? Because the CPU cooler backplate cutout doesn't expose a big part of the screws on the right side. It's just that way, but don't worry, the build will still work. Now you can go through most of the same build process as in most scenarios, install the front panel connectors, power supply connectors, etc.

SSD Installation: Remove the HDD tray by removing the screws inside the case that are screwed in at the top of the tray. Then remove the 4 screws on the bottom of the case in that area (they're quite obvious) and just lift it out. Now, take the SSD and follow the instructions in the case manual. They're pretty straightforward.

Let me know what you think, and give me suggestions on what to improve. I'll be making more guides like this in the future, don't worry.

Also: I will post a completed build of the similar system. That will be posted by Monday. Will update with that when I make it.

Completed Build Posted: theSilence_

Compatibility: No issues or incompatibilities found.

Component Selection Base Promo Shipping Tax Price Where
CPU Intel Core i5-6500 3.2 GHz Quad-Core Processor
Base
$235.99
Promo
Shipping
FREE
Tax
Price
$235.99
Where
Buy
CPU Cooler CRYORIG H7 49 CFM CPU Cooler
Base
$49.99
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Price
$49.99
Where
Buy
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-B150M-DS3H Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard
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No Prices Available
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Memory Crucial 8 GB (2 x 4 GB) DDR4-2133 Memory
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No Prices Available
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Storage OCZ Trion 100 480 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive
Base
$361.28
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Price
$361.28
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Case Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mini Tower Case
Base
$49.99
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Price
$49.99
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Power Supply SeaSonic 350 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply
Base
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No Prices Available
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Case Fan Noctua NF-S12A ULN 120 mm Fan
Base
$19.95
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Tax
Price
$19.95
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Buy
Total: $717.20
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Compatibility Notes

  • Note:Some physical dimension restrictions cannot (yet) be automatically checked, such as cpu cooler / RAM clearance with modules using tall heat spreaders.

Part List Price History

    Comments

    • 45 months ago
    • 1 point

    10/10

    • 45 months ago
    • 1 point

    Your choice, they are both good part lists.

    • 44 months ago
    • 0 points

    The Thermaltake Frio Silent 14/NiC L32 is better than the CRYORIG H7.

    • 44 months ago
    • 1 point

    No, it isn't. Stop saying that.

    • 44 months ago
    • 0 points

    Really? OC and stock

    • 44 months ago
    • 1 point

    I knew it. That same exact TweakTown review that has been debunked over and over again.


    Based on TweakTown

    Stock load (H7): 52°C

    Stock load (L32): 51.5°C

    Stock difference: .5°C

    Overclocked load (H7): 74.92°C

    Overclocked load (L32): 74.42°C

    Overclocked difference: .5°C


    The coolers compared (PCPP)

    Height (H7): 145mm

    Height (L32 and Frio Silent 14): 160mm

    Difference: 15mm


    Cryorig H7:

    • aesthetically pleasing
    • relatively easy to install (unless you don't follow the manual)
    • small
    • performs well
    • $34.50

    Those thermaltake coolers:

    • large
    • unattractive
    • performs (not too well for its size, as well as a 140mm fan)
    • $34.99

    See my point? Bad price (and size) to performance.

    Here's another link

    • 44 months ago
    • 1 point

    I didn't know that list was a whole bunch of information.

    Thanks a ton. I would've never even visited that site.

    [comment deleted]
    • 45 months ago
    • 1 point

    Ultra quiet, nice n fast, and very asthetically pleasing. :)

    [comment deleted]
    • 45 months ago
    • 1 point

    We haven't gotten it there yet. And, I'll be the one who's appreciating it, since I'll be using it. :P

    [comment deleted]

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    add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube