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Forum Topic "Add Rakuten as Merchant"

Niyawa submitter 1 point 38 months ago

Duly noted. If there's anything the community can do to help with the process be sure to tell us. We all only have to win by having more choices when checking for the lowest prices of parts.

Forum Topic "Retailer Request: CRYORIG M9i, M9a and C7"

Niyawa submitter 1 point 38 months ago

Thanks. Just to append, I'd appreciate if you could check out the pricing of the H7 as well, seems like Amazon is stuck in "$41.90" for weeks in the price on the actual part page, even though it's free shipping when you actually check it.

Forum Topic "Recognition of helpful people"

Niyawa 1 point 38 months ago

I never posted there outside of giveaways but whenever I check back for some tech threads through google, I end up having the same "thoughts". Linus has been adapting his content little by little to pander to a broader audience, and with that the LTT forums are now mostly occupied by teenagers as a result. That's what I think, at least.

Still, any forum sufficiently popular will have the same issues at one point or another. PCPP will become the same if the moderation team doesn't adapt, fun stuff.

On topic, the idea OP provides is certainly something many people would appreciate, but the proposition isn't quite there yet. At the very least, it shouldn't rely on the karma system, that would be DOA.

Forum Topic "Part Request: Scythe 120mm Dual Ball Bearing fans"

Niyawa submitter 1 point 38 months ago

Appreciate it. Sorry about that, didn't notice there was one until late night yesterday.

philip's Build Guide: i5-6600K / GTX 980 Ti Gaming PC

Niyawa 1 point 38 months ago

Oh, wasn't aware of that. Thanks for the heads up.

philip's Build Guide: i5-6600K / GTX 980 Ti Gaming PC

Niyawa 5 points 38 months ago

Oh finally we see the EVGA G2. Mail-in Rebate is $30 so that makes the value even better for such a quality power supply. At this price point I would've personally gone with the Cryorig H7 to match the black/white theme of the motherboard but a nice choice of quality components is what truly matters since many people will want to build this exact same configuration. I appreciate PCPP picking the right components and taking their time making a easy to follow build guide.

manirelli's Build Guide: i5-4460 / GTX 960 Gaming PC

Niyawa 1 point 38 months ago

I commend you for replying to a 2 month old comment. Everyone will have different experiences and as I said, Hitachi/Toshiba are the same thing.

Forum Topic "Amazon for SeaSonic SSR-350ST"

Niyawa submitter 1 point 39 months ago

That's some SSD like speed. Thanks.

Forum Topic "Part and Retailer Request: Zotac SSDs"

Niyawa submitter 1 point 39 months ago

Thanks. Amazon link for the 120GB version is still not appearing though.

Forum Topic "PS4 Emulator"

Niyawa 2 points 39 months ago

I'd say it would take at least a decade or so before you see any working emulator that can demo the PS4 homebrew at all. If you want to play PS4 games right now, you'll have to buy one.

Forum Topic "Correction: ASRock B150M-HDV is listed as ATX when it's actually Micro ATX"

Niyawa submitter 1 point 39 months ago

No problem.

Forum Topic "Option to disable thumbnails in partlist"

Niyawa submitter 1 point 40 months ago

Thanks, appreciate it.

manirelli's Build Guide: i5-4460 / GTX 960 Gaming PC

Niyawa 2 points 40 months ago

I wouldn't say so, if evidence is to be believed it's better than anyone since they're the only few who offer 3 year warranty on their retail drives, while everyone else is 2 years or lower.

manirelli's Build Guide: i5-4460 / GTX 960 Gaming PC

Niyawa 2 points 40 months ago

Hitachi has sold their 3.5" hard drive division to Toshiba and WD got everything else, because otherwise they'd have to deal with many authorities regarding a potential monopoly. What I'm trying to say is, when you tell me "i'll just stay with hitachi and WD for my builds" you're actually saying "i'll just stay with hitachi/toshiba and wd for my builds". This is what I would do too, as I've heard way too many negative things about Seagate to actually give them a chance.

manirelli's Build Guide: i5-4460 / GTX 960 Gaming PC

Niyawa 1 point 40 months ago

Toshiba HDDs are the same as Hitachi's so you make a moot point, thanks anyway.

manirelli's Build Guide: i5-4460 / GTX 960 Gaming PC

Niyawa 2 points 40 months ago

Hmn, would it be alright to say the purpose of this build is 1080p gaming around $800 price range? If so I have my own alternative (that's not necessarily better but just evens some of the budget around):

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-4460 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor $184.99 @ B&H
Motherboard ASRock H97 PRO4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard $75.98 @ Newegg
Memory Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory $74.99 @ Newegg
Storage Sandisk SSD PLUS 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $74.25 @ B&H
Storage Toshiba 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $89.99 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce GTX 960 2GB Video Card $184.00 @ Adorama
Case NZXT Source 210 Elite (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $49.99 @ B&H
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA G2 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $84.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $819.18
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-09-16 13:38 EDT-0400

An extra of 2 TB of HDD space with 3 year warranty + 8 GB of RAM + 10/10 jonnyguru PSU with 5 year warranty + ATX board for more expansion options, although this could also be a con since said board only has a 1 year warranty. You could get around $30 returned if some components with mail-in rebates were used but to make things fair I didn't do it. Feedback is appreciated.

Forum Topic "Scythe Ninja 4 CPU Cooler #SCNJ-4000"

Niyawa 1 point 40 months ago

Link to the store page.

Unfortunately Scythe doesn't have a strong presence on the NA market so gems like the Ninja and Kotetsu end up being pricier than the MSRP for most part.

Forum Topic "Not in database: Rosewill W1-B/S"

Niyawa submitter 1 point 41 months ago

Hmn? Maybe something to do with my compatibility filter, sorry about that.

Forum Topic "Not in database: Sandisk Z400s SSDs"

Niyawa submitter 1 point 41 months ago

Okay, thanks for your hard work.

Forum Topic "Not in database: Sandisk Z400s SSDs"

Niyawa submitter 1 point 41 months ago

Thanks. How does it go about the image thumbnails? Can I do anything to help on that side or it'll eventually be added to the database later?

Blog Post "NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti Released"

Niyawa 1 point 44 months ago

This does make me wonder what's the point of the Titan X right now. Unlike previously whereas the selling point was the huge memory buffer and compute performance, now there's just a 12GB VRAM which I dare say not even AAA developers will put to use for a long time. Maybe NVidia just wants to make sure people expect this new $999 price segment to be a thing so they can squeeze bigger margins from individuals who can afford it.

Regardless. If AMD's new card is a Titan killer as they've been hyping everyone for the last while, and is appropriately priced ($850 or so) we could see a quick price drop of the 980 Ti to around $540-560 just like the 780 Ti last year. In spite of that, I don't see things getting all that interesting until Pascal comes along, but that's a talk for next year I suppose.

philip's Build Guide: Core i5-4460 / GeForce GTX 960 Gaming PC

Niyawa 6 points 44 months ago

I mostly agree, but I'd also point out that most VRMs in the H81 motherboards are not as high-quality as the ones found on the $100 price range, so even if you're not overclocking, you could be putting the motherboard through a type of stress it wasn't meant to be used in (80W CPU + 145W GPU, instead of a 50W CPU + 60 W GPU). Of course, the number of fan headers as well. They're usually 2 (1 4-pin PWM for CPU, 2 3-pins for case fans). That's probably not enough for the amount of heat this build would put out under load.

This is not a strict thing to follow, just something to keep in mind. Should anyone still want to go this route, I'd recommend checking motherboards that have 4 power phases and 3 fan headers or more like the ASRock H81M.

philip's Build Guide: i5-4690K / R9 290X Overclocked Gaming PC

Niyawa 3 points 44 months ago

A 650W PSU would do fine, but that would make the power supply work 80-90% of its capacity at load, which is not a good practice. I'd get a 750W like the EVGA G2 just to make sure there's headroom for overclocking and peripherals. The EVO is fine but for this price point you can give yourself better options like the Kotetsu, NH-C14S, etc.

philip's Build Guide: Core i5-4460 / GeForce GTX 960 Gaming PC

Niyawa 2 points 44 months ago

I'll be looking forward to it, thanks for the hard work.

philip's Build Guide: Core i5-4460 / GeForce GTX 960 Gaming PC

Niyawa 4 points 44 months ago

Skylake and 980 Ti/390X are going to come relatively soon. If I already had a rig and was thinking about upgrading, I'd likely wait to see how things would settle and what new price points these specific parts would end up in. Intel is known to just leave their old CPUs in the wild so nothing much in terms of expectation there, but depending on how AMD performs with their new HBM card, we could see a readjust that might put the 970 around $250 or less, making it a pretty good deal. I believe this mainly because there have been a lot of sales with 970s around the $309-299 price range, which made me think manufactures are trying to squeeze as much as they can before the eventual price drop. I'm no expert so don't take my word for it, though.

In regards to this actual build, I wasn't going to nitpick at all outside of the horrendous price of the 2GB 960 as it was still solid overall... until I saw the specs of the network controller on the motherboard. Killer NICs are rebranded E2200 controllers from Qualcomm with horrible drivers that force QoS on the software level instead of the modem. They will prioritize any packets on known ports used by games, and this would be potentially a good thing if their drivers weren't so unstable and their software suite added more latency by trying to offload the packets from the CPU, a mostly meaningless behavior outside of a server environment. General knowledge on the internet is that you're paying extra for QoS bundle and nothing else, just keep it in mind.

philip's Build Guide: Core i5-4690K / Radeon R9 290X Gaming PC

Niyawa 2 points 44 months ago

Nah, prices fluctuate too much for this sort of argument. If the difference now is 20%, at one point it was 5%. Look for the quality of components, their use case, your specific use case and then decide how much you're willing to spend from there.

philip's Build Guide: i5-4690K / R9 290X Overclocked Gaming PC

Niyawa 1 point 44 months ago

Thanks for pointing that out on the cable length, appreciate it. Give me a heads up if you ever post your build with some pics here, I'd like to see how it turned out.

twizzlybear's Completed Build: Quiet Fractal Custom $1200 -- First Build in 15 Years!

Niyawa 1 point 44 months ago

In regard to the last question on the description, It would've probably been more easy to work with Noctua compared to others as they have what is considered (generally, at least) the best implementation of mounting systems for a long time now since they started using their SecuFirm. Not something I'd dwell on or anything, though.

Also, I noticed you put a Wi-Fi adapter in there. If you want to take advantage of less CPU cycles and better network stability, you should use the Intel NIC whenever possible. Of course, maybe you just want a less cables to worry about so it's not in my place to question the convenience. Oh yeah, as someone pointed out, take out those hard drive cages since you're not using them, or it's just hindering the airflow.

In any case, I'm happy to see a Kotetsu build, we need more of those. Hoping the build will serve you well for years to come.

philip's Build Guide: i5-4690K / R9 290X Overclocked Gaming PC

Niyawa 1 point 45 months ago

I believe so as well. This is more relevant for the H81 and H97/Z97 boards on the low end, but their Z97M OC Formula is the perfect example of that. If only it included an Intel NIC and a slightly better audio implementation, it would've been a no brainer at this price point.

philip's Build Guide: i5-4690K / R9 290X Overclocked Gaming PC

Niyawa 3 points 45 months ago

Sure, but I'll reply in PM since I'd like to keep the thread centered around philip's build.

philip's Build Guide: i5-4690K / R9 290X Overclocked Gaming PC

Niyawa 2 points 45 months ago

Quality of the motherboards is a tricky thing because different people will value different purposes, which leads to more diverse levels of implementations and broader market segment. You could try to put the highest end VRM, with the best PWM complexity and all the top notch features on one single board, the "all-in-one solution" and call it a day, but the market doesn't work that way. Some people prefer small form factors, others like enthusiast features, or they may just want something that works.

If you check TR's February 2015 System Guide, you'll notice they make some comments regarding the top 4 manufactures before proceeding to recommending any motherboards. To quote them:

Asus is the biggest of the four main motherboard makers, and it has the best Windows software and the most intelligent and reliable auto-overclocking functionality. Its firmware interface doesn't look as nice as Gigabyte's, but it's otherwise excellent—and it offers the best fan speed controls around. Some Asus motherboards ship with cushioned I/O shields and header adapters that make it much easier to connect finicky front-panel headers. We think Asus mobos typically offer the most polished packages overall.

I put emphasis on the last part because I believe that's a big reason of why others in general have this perspective on their boards. Not only their software seems to be the most consistent, but their line up is also very well balanced and it seems to hit most of what people are looking for. If you want reliability and good warranty, get A TUF. If you're looking for performance and extreme overclocking, get a ROG. If you're a prosumer and want the best of both worlds, the WS line is there. Their marketing team is also better in my opinion. Go to their website and check their Z97's specific board pages -- they almost convinced me they're selling unicorns. ASRock's website on the other hand seems very tech like. A list of specifications is the first thing you see at the side of a stock motherboard image. It doesn't give much faith that a random consumer passing through would feel impressed instead of overwhelmed with the lack of priority in presentation.

To give them credit, ASRock focus on value as much as they do with enthusiast products. Look at the H97 PRO4 motherboard: the only one under $80 that contains an Intel NIC and ALC892 on the same package. Their Z97 PRO4 can be had for $90 and the quality as well value it brings kicks up a good chunk of Gigabyte and MSI offerings for the same price. I wouldn't say they're necessarily worse, but to quote the article once more:

ASRock generally aims its products at more value-conscious buyers. ASRock boards typically offer a great hardware spec for the money, and some of the Z97 models even sport four-lane "Ultra M.2" slots that aren't available on competing boards. The firmware in the latest 9-series products has some nice little touches, too, but the interface isn't terribly refined. Neither is the accompanying utility software. ASRock boards are appealing primarily for their budget price tags.

Maybe it all comes down to the experience people have about their products and the perspective between both of these companies. ASUS has their marketing, their history with other components (GPUs, DACs, etc) so people might just have faith they know what they're doing. ASRock reminds me of that shy kid in school who knows how to get things done but doesn't know how to properly show it without getting people to think that "it's cheap, so it's probably not as good".

Anyway, I'm not necessarily the best person to ask this since I only took a more serious interest in PC around 2 or 3 years ago. It would be best if you don't take what I said at face value without doing some research yourself.

Blog Post "Multi-CPU Support, ECC, Registered RAM & More"

Niyawa 3 points 45 months ago

Oh, I see. That's one way I wasn't aware of, thanks.

Still, not everyone will want to create an account just for the purpose of helping and correcting the database. A button that would allow for quicker and more intuitive reports like the one above with the Amazon example sounds like a better implementation. If spam is an issue, a captcha for non-registered users seems like a good measure.

Blog Post "Multi-CPU Support, ECC, Registered RAM & More"

Niyawa 5 points 45 months ago

Thanks for the update, it must've been a lot of work behind putting all that data in a concise database.

I just have one question, has any of the staff considered the possibility of letting the users push requests to help with things like fixing outdated information or even adding new/different versions of products that might only be available in certain retailers?

A fine example would be, there's this kit of DDR4 RAM from Crucial that the website lists with Newegg and Adorama but not with Amazon, even though it's available there as well. The only way to get in touch about those things would be sending a message through the Contact & Imprint link or a direct email to one of the staff, but a more friendly user report interface like "Add another supported retailer" might be a more swift and elegant solution.

I have other ideas of the kind but I'd like to know if the staff has any on the roadmap already or if there's anything else I should be aware before putting any expectations on it.

philip's Build Guide: i5-4690K / R9 290X Overclocked Gaming PC

Niyawa 3 points 45 months ago

No problem.

Not sure why I deserve the thanks though.

philip's Build Guide: i5-4690K / R9 290X Overclocked Gaming PC

Niyawa 12 points 45 months ago

Thanks for the feedback and compliments, appreciate it.

In regards to the cooler, I made a similar post on a previous build explaining (or rather, implying) that the Kotetsu is one of those products that get drowned under the popularity of the Hyper 212 EVO simply because of how popular it is and how people always recommend it as the 'safe' choice for budget overclocking. The problem is, when a build is in the $1100-1200 price point, I believe you should be looking for value rather than budget. Kotetsu offers near NH-D15 performance (we're talking Noctua's flagship dual tower cooler here) while being less noisy than the Hyper 212 EVO, that at a price of $35 (MSRP, although realistically you find it around $40-45 instead). Of course, I'd recommend checking out SPCR's review of the Kotetsu to see it for yourself.

I've had bad experiences with horrible power supplies so you could say I'm more inclined to spend that premium over something that lingers on the threshold of diminishing returns. I agree other brands give the best bang for buck which is why I'm not against the choice of using the EVGA power supply, only the version of it (G1 vs the G2).

philip's Build Guide: i5-4690K / R9 290X Overclocked Gaming PC

Niyawa 23 points 45 months ago

It would be a good idea to explain (both here and in the video) why a certain part was chosen, even if just to highlights the cons and pros of said choice. Maybe put some music in the background when making the build too, the complete silence in between the guy talking and building feels weird somehow. I'm also wondering: was this sponsored by Amazon? Not sure. In any case, time to nitpick.

H60: Not a bad choice. My preferred option is still the Kotetsu as it frees you from potential leak, noise issues and holds a higher value all things considered. We're also talking about watercooling here though, which means the heat from the CPU will be transferred directly outside the case, also meaning a GPU with an open aftermarket cooler like the Sapphire 290X might make things inside the case hotter than usual, but unless extreme overclock is involved it's probably not a big deal.

Z97-A: Yay, happy to see this one here. I'm not sure I'm completely behind the choice of picking the USB 3.1 version since it costs $20 or so more over the original for a feature that might not be worth that much, but at this price point that's likely not that relevant. On another maybe irrelevant note, there is a variant that goes by Z97-AR. It comes without DVI and VGA (and you shouldn't care) but uses a more professional black-silver color scheme.

Vengeance: I wasn't the only one to point out on the previous build guide that at this price point, 16 GB is not unreasonable. Solid choice, regardless.

MX200: SSDs have pretty much saturated the SATA III interface now. Features, customer support, etc should be some of the most significant factors between which SSD to choose. BX100 is a cheaper and another okay alternative, although the 850 EVO is still my preferred pick as it's better in everything outside price (although I've seen the 250 GB one go as low as $95 on Amazon).

Barracuda: I'll keep mentioning this: buying any HDD that costs more than $40/TB unless under a budget is basically you ripping yourself off. For the price point of this build, you can get 3 or even 2 TB choices with more appropriate pricing and warranty. Maybe irrelevant, but Backblaze's data indicates that Seagate drives could be a bad deal as well. Might be worth looking into HGST/Toshiba or WD drives instead first.

R9 290X: Nothing much to nitpick here. 290X should have more raw power over the 970 while giving better performance at higher resolutions (with the 8 GB), although said 970 is more power efficient and will be more silent given appropriate cooler. Whichever is cheaper will do fine for 1080/1440p if that is what it comes down to though.

450D: Solid choice. The case includes dust filters on top, front and bottom for intakes, and comes with 3 fans that allow for positive pressure setup. Case choice is mostly subjective so nothing to nitpick really.

SuperNOVA NEX: The current entry included in the guide is for the old G1 version. The updated G2 offers better fan with improved noise profile and better internals with SuperFlower componentry, all around the same price. Fix that and I'm all behind it, especially given the whopping 10 year warranty and favorable 9.8 score from jonnyguru.

I have an alternative build that offers a better value for the $1200 price range or so I believe, but you all be the judge. I've used prices from other retails though so that might not be fair in this specific situation. As always, feedback is appreciated.

philip's Build Guide: Core i5-4690K / Radeon R9 290X Gaming PC

Niyawa 2 points 45 months ago

The link to the review is embedded in the post (just click in SPCR).

Thanks for the feedback, appreciate it.

philip's Build Guide: Core i5-4690K / Radeon R9 290X Gaming PC

Niyawa 3 points 45 months ago

Since this build is gaming focused, I'm sure increasing the price for 1886 or a 2133Mhz kit wouldn't make too much sense giving the amount of evidence out there that says RAM speed doesn't matter too much unless iGPU/APU is concerned.

philip's Build Guide: Core i5-4690K / Radeon R9 290X Gaming PC

Niyawa 11 points 45 months ago

The 212 EVO seems to be always the go to for value builds, and from the benchmarks I've seen I can agree it holds up pretty well for the price. I'd like to think that people should give a chance to the Scythe Kotetsu as well though. SPCR review indicates that it gives near NH-D15 performance while being less expensive (MSRP of $35 vs $100) as well quieter than the 212 EVO. A higher value all things considered.

In my opinion, a power supply is the most important part in terms of stability so I'm relieved there's a gold unit in there, but according to jonnyguru's review, the build quality and overall package in the RM line are not up to Corsair's usual standard. They seem to have slacked on the soldering and other important internal componentry on this unit in particular so wouldn't that make the Seasonic SSR-650RM a better value instead? As it is in the same price range, and scores much higher on his ranking (8.7 vs 9.8).

I won't argue that the S340 is a good value, but that would be at the $70. For $82 I'd pick the $90 Phanteks Enthoo Pro (no window) instead. Better dust-filters, more flexible hard drive cage implementation and overall more potential for better cable management (thanks to the velcro straps and whatnot). Case is a very personal thing though, so ultimately you should pick the one you like the most. Speaking purely in feature and value terms however, that seems to be the better deal.

Other nitpicky things would be the RAM, at this price point I'd expect 16 GB at least. Any SSD should be fine for consumer needs, but I'd go with the Samsung 850 EVO line for their warranty and performance. I wouldn't buy a hard drive that prices itself on more than $40/TB unless on budget which certainly isn't the case here. I don't know why you choose that motherboard but I'd go with the Z97-A as it seems to have better VRM, which from what I learned, should be the priority when overclocking is involved. Besides, motherboards don't do much for performance, but they do a lot for stability. $20 more for an overall better package wouldn't hurt at this price point. Both 970 and R9 290X seems to perform similarly on 1440p benchmarks from Anandtech's bench with one outperforming the other depending on the game so... I'd choose the 970 one because the Strix has a fanless mode built-in and Maxwell is more power efficient, which means more potential silence since you can run fans at lower RPM. I also heard a lot of bad things about AMD's drivers but refer to the end of this comment before jumping on me for that statement.

I'm aware this build had a video which means you might just have had to salvage some parts regardless, but here I am writing this anyway. I've never built a PC before but I've been researching, so I nitpicked a few things for the sake of doing so since I'm wondering if I'm in the right direction. I came up with a build that is relatively close in terms of price so I'd appreciate some feedback as well.

Blog Post "Site Update, Part 2"

Niyawa 7 points 47 months ago

Hmn, I thought I had come up with some good criticism but after this reply, it's very obvious why I'm not a designer.

I want to note that I'm not against experimenting or trying to expand your user base with new concepts. Since you gave a good reason for why things are as they are I have no complaints on that part, no view fits all after all. Ultimately, I simply want PCPP to be the best it can, at the very least I know the people behind it is still striving for that, and that makes me happy.

Blog Post "Site Update, Part 2"

Niyawa 4 points 47 months ago

The design choice behind having 1 additional click to get to the parts by hiding them under the header is an annoyance that I can't see as a necessity, given it's not saving any more precious vertical pixels than before. Just the "Blog > Title" alone has around 20-30 pixels of useless padding. If you count that with other parts of the website such as: comments spacers padding and circular avatars, you can see there's a very heavy focus on looks, but there's not much in terms of efficiency whatsoever.

I get it, touchscreens are a thing now. I'd like to believe our fingers can be fairly accurate though, and this design is overstating the amount of screen real estate it really needs. The improvements made to the loading of lists and overall website speed are hindered by these design choices that asks us for more redundant actions: more clicks, more scrolling.

I still like the design, I just believe we could use something that balances efficiency and looks in a more cozy and compact environment.

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