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Feb. 5, 2014, 7:48 p.m.

About acewingman

Setting interrupt jumpers, selecting master/slave drives, Set the 115/220 Switch, installing the BNC terminator, Create boot floppy, insert next disk x 15 while installing software ... Just some of the things that had to be done when I started building PCs. Oh you whippersnappers have it so easy. I was an AMD guy since the beginning. I built several AMD builds through the early 90s, when AMD processors matched Intel's chips clock for clock and were significantly cheaper, including a Am486 DX2-50 in 1993. Then in 1995 I bought my first Intel Pentium MMX 166 MHz (P55C/80503) CPU for $650.00. My next CPU was the Pentium II 266Mhz cartridge processor in 1997 from the Micron outlet store where I was in the right place at the right time to purchase it right when they brought it out to the showroom floor. It hadn't even been released yet, but I had one in a test system which cost me $2,700.00 of my re-enlistment bonus which I still own today, and it still powers up with Win98SE.

Build Guides

https://pcpartpicker.com/guide/B4kcCJ

Partition Recovery

https://www.easeus.com/partition-recovery

Best Threads on PCPP Website

https://pcpartpicker.com/forums/topic/191796-526christians-learning-thread

Best Parts based on a lot of things

How to use the PSU Auto-Pick tool... Click the link below for the component you want. The selected component has been hand selected from a huge list of quality parts so you can be sure to have a great selection. Once the list selects the component all you do is click the link to the part and add it to your build. If it is not what you want then click the (Show) link below the selected part to expand other options.

Power Supply auto select tool

Specs at a Glance

AMD

Intel

Overclocking

Kaby Lake Overclocking Chart

AMD System Building

Tips for buidling better Ryzen Systems

Technology I am a huge advocate of new technology and right now the latest new tech that has peaked my interest is NVMe. Take a look at this. Nobody can tell me that NVMe is not a game changer as those results are real time actual benchmarking software from thousands of users who are benchmarking their computers using the same exact benchmarks so there is no fluctuations.

Keep your eyes peeled for the latest hardware to come from AMD when they release the new Ryzen processors in April 2018. Let's see what Intel has sitting on the shelf to compete with the new AMDs.

IN ALL CASES

If possible, I would recommend using a M.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 drive on the MB. Here are some real world benchmark comparisons...

Western Digital - Black PCIe 256GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive

Benchmark

Samsung 960 EVO 250GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive

Benchmark

The PCIe/NVMe is the latest in storage technology which is faster than an SSD because it is using 4 lanes of SATA speed data lines even though all the 13 & 14 year old kids on this site will tell you differently. Several years ago I was telling people to use the SSD but times have changed, and now I am telling everybody about PCIe/NVMe drives.

--If there are more than one M.2 slot on the motherboard there will most likely be one M.2 that shares bandwidth with a SATA 6.0 Gb/s port. When the M.2 slot is populated, one of the SATA 6.0 Gb/s ports will be disabled.