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Comment reply on rcarbajal's Completed Build: Raidmax Vampire Full Tower Build. First Build Ever

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

While it isn't able to keep up with the labelled efficiency, the Raidmax 1000W unit even got a pass from HardOCP's notoriously grueling test setup. Not exactly a top of the line unit, but it's not going to spontaneously catch fire or suddenly pop and take out your mobo and GPU.

Comment reply on CrH2000's Completed Build: Green/Black Build

  • 60 months ago
  • 1 point

Realistically very little difference in game performance between the 6350 and the 8350. Both have the same 4.2GHz half-load turbo, so with very few exceptions games that will bottleneck on the 6350 are going to bottleneck on the 8350 as well.

Even a locked Haswell i3 will be as fast or faster most of the time though. The money would be far better spend on a locked i5 over any AMD CPU.

Comment reply on LeMonarque's Completed Build: 3rd Build: Project APEX - Intel 10-Core/20-Thread mATX Architecture Workstation for my Friend

  • 62 months ago
  • 2 points

All too often people think of RAID1 as a backup, which, as you mention here, it's absolutely not.

That said, it's definitely not the devil you make it out to be, and it really does have proper uses.

In this case, I would recommend putting the pair of 2TB drives in RAID1 not for backup, but for redundancy. This way should a drive fail the system will remain fully functional without any downtime, and avoids any chance of user error in forgetting to manually transfer something to both drives, etc.

Of course with that you'd want an actual backup to go with that. Ideally something external, from a USB 3.0 2TB drive, all the way up to a multi-TB RAID NAS box. With the right software (hell, Windows has all this stuff built-in) you can have the rig automatically backup the 2TB RAID1 array (and even the SSDs if you wanted) to the external backup device.

Comment reply on Blog Post "$970 Gaming Build"

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

Nothing wrong with that SSD, it's just terrifically overpriced.

At that kind of price only a few bucks more nets you a PNY Optima 240GB or a Crucial MX100 256GB.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "NAS build. Need to know if this will handle it. 24TB NAS Box"

  • 63 months ago
  • 2 points

There are better power supplies for half the money

A CX-m unit is in absolutely no way 'better' than the RM unit here. It provides more wattage and costs less, but that's the extent of it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Thermalright CPU Coolers (additions and a few corrections)"

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

SuperBiiz doesn't have them in stock - they specifically list them as discontinued.

Comment reply on istealunderwear's Completed Build: Gamma Unchained

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

It's old. Like, Sandy Bridge-E launch old.

The start shipping motherboards with the new EFI revision to support the new chips months before they come out, so that would be why it supported the Ivy chip out of the box.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Unexpected Stress Test"

  • 67 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, at least you know you're stable!

Comment reply on Canman137's Completed Build: My First Build

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

Way late, but the CX500/CX750 are most assuredly not in any way shape or form better than this Rosewill Lightning unit.

Those low end Corsair units are manufactured by CWT, and while they're acceptable, they're still using cheap capacitors, and the units are pretty average overall.

The Rosewill on the other hand is manufactured by SuperFlower, and is basically a rebranded Golden Green 800W unit. That's this one: http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story&reid=229

Top quality japanese caps all around, stellar performance, and just a higher quality unit overall, with higher efficiency to boot.

Comment reply on Xenirina's Completed Build: The Titan

  • 69 months ago
  • 1 point

Can you actually source anything on that? The chipset sinks on those boards are pretty equivalent to everything else on the market.

Comment reply on Xenirina's Completed Build: The Titan

  • 69 months ago
  • 1 point

The 990FX chipset? Or the 970 chipset?

The chipsets are manufactured by AMD, not Gigabyte. If the chipset had a problem, it would be seen across all manufacturers.

Comment reply on Xenirina's Completed Build: The Titan

  • 69 months ago
  • 1 point

The 990FXA-UD3 is an 8+2 system, while the 970A-D3P is 4+1. Perhaps you were thinking of the 970A-UD3 or the 970A-UD3P, both of which are 8+2 and share similar systems to the 990FX board.

Comment reply on Xenirina's Completed Build: The Titan

  • 69 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry, what?

There was one revision of the GA-990FXA-UD3 that had some power delivery issues for the FX-8350, but that's not this board.

The only big issue here is that this is a 4+1 phase board, meaning that the overclocking limit will be a good chunk lower than it might be on a proper 8+2 phase board.

Comment reply on Masterpizza2's Completed Build: Gaming PC AMD + nVidia

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, HWMonitor isn't going to give you an accurate reading.

If you want full system load from the wall, get a Kill-A-Watt meter.

Otherwise, all you're going to get is really estimates.

Comment reply on odracirstark's Completed Build: Sexy Lady.

  • 72 months ago
  • 15 points

Just looks like a typical build by someone who either thinks they know a lot, or has a friend that thinks they know a lot.

  • 8350 (because moar cores)

  • Seidon 120M (because liquid cooling!)

  • Sabertooth (because Sabertooth! and Asus!)

  • 16GB of RAM (because more is better!)

  • Single retail-box 1TB HDD with no SSD (because 1TB is plenty for anyone and SSDs cost lots!)

  • 4GB 7850 because more VRAM is better right? I mean Nvidia does it, so it must be good!

  • 1000W Bronze semi-modular PSU (because big parts need big watts amirite?)

Comment reply on odracirstark's Completed Build: Sexy Lady.

  • 72 months ago
  • -1 points

If you were willing to sacrifice the CPU to an FX-6300 or the board to something lower, you could have afforded a 7970 GHz, which give you a net boost in performance for the CPU sacrifice or even better performance for the mobo sacrifice

Not very good advice. To a point sacrificing CPU for GPU is a good call, but an FX-6300 with a 7970 GHz Edition is just way too unbalanced.

Comment reply on mpnx900's Completed Build: MSI Gaming Build

  • 72 months ago
  • 6 points

A couple tips:

  • Flip your PSU over. This will allow it to intake cool air from the bottom of the case, and will also position the hard-wired cables right up near the motherboard tray for much easier cable management.

  • Grab a pile of black zipties, unplug everything, and start again. Pull all the cables you'll need from the PSU to the back, then run them through the closest motherboard tray holes. Pull out as much slack as you can and ziptie them down.

Comment reply on Richard_Parker's Completed Build: Whitey's a ninja

  • 72 months ago
  • 0 points

If I was doing media editing and authoring I'd definitely take an 8320, other less expensive overclocking board, better cooling, 16GB of RAM, a 240GB SSD, a 3TB HDD, a quieter case, and a modular PSU over what you threw together.

Again, you're coming from the standpoint of gaming performance being paramount over all else, and completely ignoring any other needs as useless.

Although given a similar budget (and assuming the OS and blu-ray burner are required), I would definitely make some changes, but build something relatively similar: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1Q9Vg

Comment reply on Richard_Parker's Completed Build: Whitey's a ninja

  • 72 months ago
  • 1 point

Well of course you don't "necessarily" need one, but under the media-focused assumption it could very well be needed.

And why would someone who already has a copy of Windows add one to their build?

Comment reply on Richard_Parker's Completed Build: Whitey's a ninja

  • 72 months ago
  • 1 point

So you've got:

  • A significantly worse cooler.

  • Significantly less storage space on both the SSD and HDD.

  • Much more noise production through the non-sound dampened case, and twin high-draw 280X cards.

  • A non-modular PSU? I mean seriously, maybe for a single GPU system with a 400-500W unit, but for a dual-GPU system worth $1500? please.

  • No blu-ray drive.

  • No copy of Windows.

Pretty easy to see this rig is much more centered around media work, not straight gaming. Though if this rig were actually to be built, a bundle of money by say switching out the motherboard for something similarly good but without the Asus ROG tax, and perhaps the cooler to the Water 2.0 Extreme for $2 more for a bunch more performance, but it's not really "bad".

Not every PC can just be pushed through the ol' cookie cutter, because not everyone is building simply for gaming performance.

Comment reply on dshojaat's Completed Build: High End Gtx 770 Build By A 13 Year Old

  • 73 months ago
  • 0 points

The T40 is only worth buying over the 212 EVO if it's cheaper. The non-PWM fan is a complete dealbreaker, as either you're running at full-speed all the time (noisy) for optimal performance, or throttling it back with a low-noise adapter, killing performance, but making it quiet.

Of course that ignores the fact that the prices on the EVO have shot up again, making it not worth the money.

The Enermax ETS-T40-TB outperforms it at $35, and is quieter due to using a better fan.

Comment reply on BerenElendil's Completed Build: Beren's Barebones PC (No prior experience, 1st build, occasional BSOD)

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Moving a RAM stick over? He's only got a single stick.

Comment reply on BerenElendil's Completed Build: Beren's Barebones PC (No prior experience, 1st build, occasional BSOD)

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

"Much better" is a huge exaggeration. The vast majority of tasks are no memory bandwidth bottlenecked. Generally the most performance increase you might see from single to dual channel is on the order of 5-10%.

That is of course not including things like file Zipping which are very memory bandwidth locked.

Comment reply on bsballc831's Completed Build: CAD and Rendering Machine

  • 76 months ago
  • 2 points

Corsair doesn't manufacture any of the units they sell, but they design their own units, or heavily modify OEM designs to fit their requirements.

While yes, Seasonic does manufacture the units, and they're not a very good example of the following point, but OEM does not tell you everything about a PSU. Some build pretty much to order, which can mean some stellar units, and some crappy units.

Comment reply on bsballc831's Completed Build: CAD and Rendering Machine

  • 76 months ago
  • 2 points

Not directly rebranded, but they do use Seasonic's platforms for their units. The new ProSeries Black FullModular line is all based on the Seasonic X-Series platform. Seasonic does in fact manufacture the units though.

Corsair has used Channel Well Tech (CWT) pretty much since the start, as well as Seasonic.

Currently it stands like this:

CWT: CX and HX lines.

Chicony Power Technology: TX and TX-M.

Seasonic: AX 760 and 860.

Flextronics: AX 760i, 860i, and 1200i.

Comment reply on bsballc831's Completed Build: CAD and Rendering Machine

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

That heavily depends what you're rendering with which programs and how much money you have to blow.

The i7-3930k is overclockable, and thus offers better performance/value than any single-CPU Xeon system. Even dual Xeons, especially cheap ones, would vastly increase the cost without a major performance increase compared to the overclocked i7. Where you get to big gains is in dual high-clocked 6/8-core Xeons, but a system like that, just for the motherboard and CPUs, could easily surpass the cost of this entire system.

Quadros are consumer GPUs with specialized firmware. The higher end ones can also have ECC RAM. The biggest difference is in the double precision performance, which is very important for scientific number crunching and simulations where accuracy is extremely important. Some specific CAD applications can see a large benefit here, but generally consumer GPUs offer a much cheaper option with often much higher performance.

Comment reply on redventura's Completed Build: Vengeance 8-core

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

AV-GP is for DVRs and surveillance systems, not for PCs. It's for environments like multi-stream video recording where write errors aren't important and can just be skipped.

Comment reply on derekyan0624's Completed Build: First Time Build - Mini-ITX Gaming Box

  • 77 months ago
  • 1 point

The only minor issue I see is the mobo. Sad that Gigabyte locked the voltage on it! Still, given the airflow and cooler retrictions, you've done pretty well at 4.3GHz on the CPU.

Comment reply on kelsyntsubaki's Completed Build: Aperature Labs | Wheatley

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, you'd need to add either a USB or PCIe wifi adapter, unless you specifically buy one of the few motherboards with it built in.

To handle that kind of speed though, your ideal option would be gigabit ethernet, as that will deliver ideal speeds at a reasonable price.

If you must go wireless, the fastest solution is going to be 802.11ac wireless, but the cost of a wireless router supporting it, and a proper PCIe card capable of delivering that speed is going to be ~$250.

Comment reply on Rust_Streak's Completed Build: PC 2.0 You can (totally) build

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

Hence 'mostly'. You may get a bit higher, and you may be able to run at lower voltages. ASIC quality is not really a solid indicator of actual overclockability though. There are definitely chips with ASICs people would say are low that clock higher than high ASIC cards.

It's still all in the silicon lottery.

Don't expect that just because you've got a high ASIC number that you're going to magically get a hell of a 1300MHz overclock on an air cooled chip. Remember, the VRMs and cooling in general also come into play here. You may get stuck at 1150, or you may get up to 1250.

My point is: don't let that ASIC number give you false hope.

Comment reply on Rust_Streak's Completed Build: PC 2.0 You can (totally) build

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

ASIC quality is mostly meaningless.

Comment reply on Rust_Streak's Completed Build: PC 2.0 You can (totally) build

  • 78 months ago
  • -2 points

The Superflower-built Rosewill units are easily on par with high end units from Corsair, Seasonic, etc.

You're not "OCD" either.

Comment reply on JohnyMST's Completed Build: My New custom build PC

  • 78 months ago
  • 2 points

Photoshop is OpenCL, but if fully accelerated by anything above a 7750, AMD or Nvidia.

After Effects is CUDA-only for now, so Nvidia is the way to go.

Comment reply on JohnyMST's Completed Build: My New custom build PC

  • 78 months ago
  • 3 points

This is only true of Photoshop and Illustrator. Everything else still uses CUDA.

Comment reply on JohnyMST's Completed Build: My New custom build PC

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

Plus Window's SuperFetch will fill it up with applications and things. Not like it's going to waste.

Comment reply on JohnyMST's Completed Build: My New custom build PC

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

Well yeah, if you're running Premiere Pro having the CUDA support is a solid factor. If you're using Vegas though, AMD's huge OpenCL power is the way to go.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "i3 3220 vs Pentium G860?"

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

The 3850 is definitely not on par with the i7. It does well in some multithreaded tasks like video editing/encoding, streaming, and compressing files, but for gaming it's got absolutely nothing on an i5. A fair comparison is the i5-3470 for a general use/gaming machine.

If somebody is looking for a rig to do gaming with a mid-range card, and some video work, then the 8350 is worth a look. For a straight gaming machine, i5 every time.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Corsair HX750 PSU - $125 (barely used) OBO"

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't think you're going to get anywhere near $125 for it. New it's $130 after rebate, and you're competing against units like the Rosewill Capstone-M 750 ($120 right now) and NZXT Hale 90 750W ($110 right now).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Will I need a thermal compound for my GPU?"

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

Personally I always replace the thermal paste on my GPUs as long as there's no security sticker over the cooler screws. Usually the factory globs on way too much, and I commonly see 5-10C drops with fresh stuff.

This does not sound like a GPU issue though.

Comment reply on Part HIS Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card

  • 82 months ago
  • 1 point

Technically there is no "7870". AMD's official designation for all models with this core is "7870 GHz Edition".

Comment reply on kj22679's Completed Build: Giving Some Extended Life to the Computer My Kids Use to Game.

  • 82 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, and the i3 will still win. It's a quad, but you have to remember that it's a 65nm Kentsfield chip from 2007. You've got Yorkfield (45mm die shrink), Nehalem (45nm - new architecture), Westmere (32nm die shrink), Sandy Bridge (32nm - new architecture), and finally Ivy Bridge (22nm die shrink). Each architecture and shrink brought its own IPC boost. So much so that clock for clock the Ivy Bridge architecture is ~40% faster. Combined with turbo boost and hyperthreading, it just outperforms. "Raw compute power" isn't really relevant to many tasks in the real world, and even where the Q6600 should theoretically win, the i3 manages to tie or even come out on top.

Comment reply on kj22679's Completed Build: Giving Some Extended Life to the Computer My Kids Use to Game.

  • 82 months ago
  • 1 point

Absolutely not. A current-gen i3 will beat this thing to a pulp. It may be a quad, but it's a quad on a old, slower architecture, with a low clock speed. It's even outclassed by a Phenom II X4.

Basically, it's going to heavily bottleneck a 7950 in modern games, especially those that are optimized for 2 threads.

Comment reply on mvalviar's Completed Build: Lilly

  • 82 months ago
  • 2 points

The stock cooler really isn't very loud. Also, what do you mean your only choice was Noctua? There are tons of 4+ heatpipe coolers for less money. Enermax ETS-T40-TB is basically just as quiet, and performs extremely close as well.

That said, the UD3H is just wasted on a locked processor. a $60 H77 board would have done the exact same job for less. Hell, with that board you could have got a 3570k for much less, and easily outperformed that 3770 with a little OC.

Comment reply on kj22679's Completed Build: Giving Some Extended Life to the Computer My Kids Use to Game.

  • 82 months ago
  • 1 point

A Q6600 would bottleneck a 7950 like no tomorrow. Max I'd go putting in a machine like this would be a 7850, and the CPU would still be the main bottleneck.

Comment reply on Inferno986return's Completed Build: TV Computer - First Build

  • 82 months ago
  • 0 points

Cheaper CPU, mobo, GPU, case, PSU...

That said, it's a solid all-around gaming machine.

Comment reply on Abuilder's Completed Build: Home Theater/Server Build

  • 83 months ago
  • 1 point

I haven't tried it, but apparently there is a workaround to get encrypted Blurays working in VLC right now.

Comment reply on Abuilder's Completed Build: Home Theater/Server Build

  • 83 months ago
  • 2 points

While the 1866 (or even better, 2133) memory would be ideal if this were being used for gaming, it's going to be used for media playback and serving, thus the DDR3-1600 is more than sufficient.

Comment reply on sketch24's Completed Build: Bitmining, Gaming, HTPC

  • 86 months ago
  • 1 point

Bitmining.

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add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube