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pcoctaguru's Completed Build: MiniITX Build

tmb1979 1 point 11 days ago

I think it must have been a deal he got on the 1050ti, or local availability.

pcoctaguru's Completed Build: MiniITX Build

tmb1979 1 point 11 days ago

I personally think a 1600 for basically the same price and a sapphire pulse ITX RX570 for a bit more than that 1050ti than that would have done the job far better. Maybe the OP could clarify why he ended up with this combo? Was the GPU inherited/donated on top of the APU he already bought? Don't get me wrong, it's not wrong per-se but there seems to be a better combo out there than this.

Forum Topic "please help i am not sure about this situation and would love some help from some more experienced people out there"

tmb1979 1 point 1 month ago

legomaster is right. What this means is that you may not be able to use your Zen+ CPU (2600) on the B350 motherboard straightaway, as this was a Motherboard that was produced at the time of the Ryzen first generation Zen CPUs, so it probably has an older BIOS pre-installed on it. To get access to the BIOS to update it, you will need a CPU that works with the B350, so what AMD often do is send out an old APU for you to use as a boot-kit if you get stuck, but that can take weeks, plus you get billed eventually if you don't send it back. Just something to consider. Going to the motherboard manufacturer's website might give you an idea of whether or not the BIOS will work with the CPU straight out of the box. Good luck!

Forum Topic "Which CPU should i choose?"

tmb1979 1 point 1 month ago

Ryzen gives great performance and all round value, with the AM4 motherboard socket that isn't due to be obsolete for many years, so you will have an upgrade path. Don't ignore the first generation Ryzen CPUs - some of them give extremely good gaming value, such as the first Ryzen 5 series (1600 and 1400) which can now be had for some very low prices and will still do very, very well. it will be hard to tell the difference between these and the Zen+ CPUs (the ones that start with 2). Zen+ has slightly better clock speeds (2600 is the pick of the bunch and the 2600X is the one for you if you don't fancy overclocking). However, If you are set on an Intel chip, I wouldn't look for anything else than the i5 8400 or 8600K in their line up. Those are good gaming CPUs, with very good performance, although the 8400 just limits you to non-overclocking and both are not as high performing in multi-threaded tasks, which could be more important in some games. Honestly, if I were you, Ryzen 5 1st generation is the best value and Ryzen 5 Zen+ models are the best all round performance to price. With Ryzen 3000 round the corner, you've got the chance that AMD will be on a level with Intel for the first time in years. I'm personally waiting to upgrade my first gen ryzen CPU to a 3000 series CPU. Also, don't buy an X370 or X470 Motherboard unless you need a lot of expansion slots and peripherals - B350/B450 would be best for you.

manirelli's Build Guide: Modest AMD Gaming Build

tmb1979 2 points 2 months ago

Manirelli is quite right. Also, bigger boards allow for more comprehensive and stronger Voltage Regulation components (voltage regulation modules or VRMs) and accompanying heatsinks to sit on those, to disperse the heat they have to handle, therefore giving you greater headroom on unlocked chipsets (unrestricted hardware) to increase the performance of your CPU. With matx boards you will sometimes find that the thermal solution is a little weak, meaning if you put a chip with considerable overclocking potential into one, it may struggle to reach higher frequencies because it can’t take the extra heat from the voltage you need to put through it. MSI appear to have an advantage currently because of their matx board thermal solutions, which buildzoid has highlighted in YouTube videos on the “Gamers Nexus” channel.

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